In A Word Yes (1969 - )
In a Word: Yes (1969 – ) is a 5-CD box set that contains selected songs from YES‘ entire career from its inception in 1969 to 2001, including material from the 1989 Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe album. It was released in 2002.

The sonically improved and more expansive successor to 1991’s Yesyears, In a Word: Yes (1969 – ) marked the beginning of YES‘ association with Rhino Records, who would remaster and reissue the band’s core Atlantic Records catalogue throughout 2003 and 2004 – while adding many of Yesyears‘ previously unreleased performances as bonus tracks on the individual newly remastered CDs.

The booklet contains essays by Chris Welch and Bill Martin, as well as forewords from Rush bassist Geddy Lee and Phish drummer Jon Fishman.

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In A Word Yes (1969 - )
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Tales From The Edge - By Chris Welch

Tales From The Edge

I. Prologue

“Don’t let go of your dreams…
that’s what YES is all about.”

Jon Anderson is quite clear about the purpose of the band he helped create all those years ago. And despite the complexity of their story, a kind of rock’n’roll Lord Of The Rings, there is an underlying simplicity to the YES saga. All they’ve ever really cared about is keeping the dream – and their music – alive. And that perhaps has been this extraordinary group’s greatest achievement.

Their original plan was to create the best band “on the scene.” In those early days, that meant late-‘6os London. For all their ambition and optimism, the 20-something-year-olds who founded YES as a small club attraction never expected it to become a world-famous stadium rock band, with a career spanning more than 30 years.

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Although the founders, Jon Anderson and Chris Squire, have remained keepers of the flame, there have been so many comings and goings that even the most devoted fan sometimes finds it hard to keep up. Quite often the same musicians have made repeated Shakespearean-style entrances and exits. Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman have come and gone – and come back again. Trevor Rabin, their innovative guitarist, was with them for 11 years but was still perceived as the “new boy” when he left. There have been five keyboard players, four guitarists, and two drummers through the ranks. There was even another singer, Trevor Horn, when Jon Anderson took a brief sabbatical (Horn would later produce one of the band’s biggest-selling albums). At one point there were even two opposing versions of the band running in tandem. But there has only ever been one bass player: the indefatigable, unflappable Chris Squire.

Clearly, this is no ordinary group. As diverse, emotional, and committed artists, the men of YES have always been driven to make stimulating and satisfying music, and to hell with market forces. Anyone new entering the lineup came aboard with the knowledge that this was a kind of musical college. They arrived in awe of the guitar prowess of pioneers like Peter Banks and Steve Howe. They came in knowing that Chris Squire had virtually defined the sound of bass guitar in modern rock. They deferred to an array of past masters, including keyboard men Tony Kaye, Rick Wakeman, and Patrick Moraz, and drum masters Bill Bruford and Alan White.

For all their success and popularity, YES has been buffeted by the winds of change, topping the charts and the popularity polls one minute, suffering critical abuse and being ignored the next. This has sometimes been the lot of the band responsible for great original compositions like “Yours Is No Disgrace,” “Starship Trooper,” “Astral Traveller,” and “Roundabout.”

Although their original intention was to push pop music to a higher plane, YES have always retained a love of good tunes and a solid beat. It was the individual members’ varied musical backgrounds, tastes, ideas, and strong personalities that ensured YES would create such remarkable albums as Fragile, Close To The Edge, Tales From Topographic Oceans, and 90125. They’ve had their arguments and splits. But they’ve also had a lot of fun, and with audiences worldwide still eager to hear that unique brand of Yesmusic, they know it’s all been worthwhile.

II. Liftoff and a Landing (1968-1969)

The YES story began in a tiny Soho bar known to its was habitues as few La Chasse. This modest watering hole on Wardour Street, London, was just a few yards from the Marquee Club and two flights above a betting shop. Pubgoers could look down on the fans queuing around the block, all hoping to get into the Marquee to see Cream, The Who, or The Jimi Hendrix Experience.

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Conditions inside the Marquee were primitive. The floor was covered in chewing gum, there was no air-conditioning, and the walls dripped with sweat. The artists’ dressing room was a graffiti-smeared corridor leading toward a low-rise stage. To top it off, the club manager, John C. Gee, was a straitlaced disciplinarian who made it clear that he preferred Frank Sinatra to rock’n’roll. Despite all this, it was a strangely magical place, offering music seven nights a week. Every top British band wanted to play there. It became a showcase, where new outfits developed their music and – hopefully – got “discovered.”

The only drawback was the complete absence of a bar. For preshow drinks, musicians had to brave The Ship, a crowded pub farther up the street, a place lacking in privacy. A solution was found when the Marquee’s assistant manager, Jack Barrie, opened La Chasse in May 1967. It quickly became a popular haunt. Among the regulars were such proto-stars as Phil Collins, busy hustling for gigs; 16-year-old Peter Frampton, showing off his latest satin shirt; and Keith Moon, just plain showing off. (One night Moon the Loon climbed over the rooftops of Soho from The Who’s office and burst into the bar via the fire escape.)

There were also less volatile visitors, young musicians from Marquee bands, often engaged in animated, secretive discussions: “Why don’t you leave your group and join mine?” Among La Chasse’s regulars were Jon Anderson, a singer formerly with The Warriors, and Chris Squire, the tall and intense bass guitarist with The Syn. Anderson had recently returned from a German tour with The Warriors, penniless and unemployed, and occasionally swept up the club to earn a crust. When Jack Barrie suggested Anderson and Squire have a drink and a chat about songwriting, the two young men discovered they had similar ideas about music. They discussed their favourite artists – The Byrds, The Nice, Simon & Garfunkel, and The 5th Dimension – and began sowing the seeds for YES.

It was 1968, a good time for musical idealism. Thanks to The Beatles and Pink Floyd, mainstream pop had become an experimental melting pot. Albums were becoming more than just collections of hits; they now provided scope for original material. And there were dozens of clubs where groups could scrape a living and work out ideas. These venues wanted great vocal harmonies, good lyrics, and a terrific band with adventurous arrangements.

Chris Squire had performed in a cathedral choir as a child, so he appreciated the importance of technique and harmony. Born on March 4, 1948, in Kingsbury, Wembley, England, he went to a public school and sang at St. Andrew’s Church, in Kingsbury. There he befriended fellow chorister Andrew Jackman, and together they played in a band called The Selfs. After leaving school at 17, Squire went to work in a music store, earning £8 a week. He took up the bass when his mother bought him a cheapo Futurama model, which he later replaced with a more expensive Rickenbacker.
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The Selfs dissolved and re-formed as The Syn in 1965 with Steve Nardelli on vocals. (“He sounded like Rod Stewart,” Squire recalls.) On lead guitar was Peter Banks (born April 8, 1947, in Barnet, London). Inspired by Lonnie Donegan, Banks started out with a £5 guitar he described as virtually “unplayable.” He then switched to a Gretsch model, in homage to George Harrison of The Beatles. At 16 Banks joined The Nighthawks, then The Devil’s Disciples. The band lasted a year, until Banks met Chris Squire in 1965 and was told The Syn were looking for a new guitarist. So he joined the group, which had a Marquee residency. “That was my dream, to play the Marquee,” Banks says. “We never thought any further than that in those days.”

“We did vocal harmonies, and The Syn was very similar to early YES,” Squire remembers. “They played a lot of Motown covers, but by now it was 1967 and the Summer of Love.”

The Syn embraced the new psychedelia, began writing rock operas, and even dressed up as flower people onstage. They supported Jimi Hendrix at the Marquee, but the audience was there for Jimi, and despite their bizarre mixture of Who-style autodestruction and flower power, The Syn were going nowhere. The singer left, and Banks joined Mabel Greer’s Toyshop. By coincidence, one night the unknown Jon Anderson sat in with them.

After some failed attempts to join existing groups, Anderson decided he’d be better off working with individual musicians on his own projects. When he and Chris Squire first met, they ended up returning to Squire’s flat that same night and writing songs together. The result was “Sweetness,” which would eventually appear on YES‘ debut album. For a while Anderson became a member of Squire’s most recent band, the oddly named Mabel Greer’s Toyshop, which had also featured Banks on the guitar. By this time, however, Banks had left to join Neat Change and had been replaced by Clive Bailey.

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The Toyshop were in a state of flux, and the soft-spoken young Anderson intrigued Squire. “He was very Northern when I first met him!” the bassist says. “He has an Accrington accent that I found amusing but charming as well. I was a Southern English public schoolboy and hadn’t met many people like Jon. That was part of the reason we decided to work together, because we had such different backgrounds. We also had similar tastes, and that’s when we decided to form a band.”

The fledgling group needed a drummer, so Bill Bruford was recruited from an advert in Melody Maker. Bruford was born May 17, 1948, in Sevenoaks, Kent. The son of a veterinary surgeon, he was bright, ambitious boy who went to Tonbridge Public School. “I was born and raised in the same house,” he says, “Where I started playing drums in the attic, when I was 13.” His sister gave him a pair of wire brushes as a birthday present one year, the young man was hooked on drumming. He particularly admired the styles of Max Roach and Philly Joe Jones. “I learned to play swishing brushes on the back of an LP sleeve while watching jazz on TV,” he recalls. “It was a perfect education!”
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Eventually Bruford was given a real snare drum and began building up an entire kit. He then discovered that some of his boarding school classmates has a modern jazz group. Their regular drummer taught Bruford how to improvise, and he subsequently joined the lineup. “That’s how we started playing,” he says. “Then The Beatles and Stones came along, and we thought they were quite good, but not nearly as good as Art Blakey and The Jazz Messengers!”

Bruford went on to Leeds University to study economics and might have ended up working for British Airways. Well, that’s what his parents had planned. Unfortunately for them, their son had a “gap year” between school and University, which he spent mostly gigging with jazz and rock bands. Then came the winds of fate. “One day I placed an ad in Melody Maker for work,” Bruford recalls. “A guy called Jon Anderson rang and asked me to meet him. We set about forming YES, and we had no idea of the potential.”

This new outfit consisting of Jon, Chris, and Bill began rehearsing at the Lucky Horseshoe, a coffee bar on London’s Shaftesbury Avenue. A few hours after that first meeting, Bruford performed at the last Mabel Greer gig, at the Rachel Macmillan College, with Clive Bailey on guitar. The band was paid £11. Says Bill: “We played ‘Midnight Hour’ ­ forever. Chris and Jon sang harmony, and I thought, Wow, they’re like The Beach Boys. So we started to work regularly together. Clive moved on fairly quickly, and then Peter Banks appeared, who had been in The Syn with Chris. They were exciting times.”

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Banks had been thrown out of Neat Change (for refusing to become a skinhead) when he got a call from Squire, asking him to rehearse with a new version of Mabel Greer’s Toyshop, which Squire said was going to be called YES. “But that’s my idea!” Banks replied. Banks had proposed the name earlier. Like The Who, it was short enough to ensure top billing. “The name YES kind of stuck,” the guitarist says. “We used it as a kind of temporary name until something better came along. Nobody has thought of anything better yet.”
Name origins aside, YES had a more pressing issue: They urgently needed a keyboard player. Enter Tony Kaye, a classically trained pianist. Born Anthony John Selridge on January 11, 1946, in Leicester, Kaye was a good-looking and affable boy who began studying piano at the age of four. He aspired to be a concert pianist, but eventually discovered jazz and joined a local dance orchestra instead. “We played every week, and it was a mind blower,” Kaye recalls of that stint. “I got my first organ, a Vox Continental, with the band and also started listening to R&B.”

When he left school, he began playing with a variety of touring rock groups, once backing Roy Orbison. When Squire met Kaye and asked him to join, the first version of YES was complete. However, it was six months before Tony could switch from Vox to Hammond organ and provide the funky, swirling chords that fleshed out the new arrangements YES was busily preparing.

This new band wanted a full sound right from the start. Guitar, bass, drums, and organ would provide the power to support Anderson’s lead vocals and flights of fancy. They would ditch the old soul hits for the songs of Lennon/McCartney, Simon & Garfunkel, and Leonard Bernstein. They would also write strong melodies of their own, with Anderson’s expressive lyrics at the fore. It was a learning experience for them all, but they were brand­new, and, by thunder, there would be no interference from managers, producers, or record companies. YES meant YES. They could make music they liked.

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The results, once the men had emerged – somewhat deafened – from the claustrophobic basement, would be astounding. They were already experienced, trained musicians with plenty to say, and yet they devoted their reserves of technique to the common good. This was no simple battle of noise – although there would be complaints from recording engineers when the group began overblowing in the studio. Most of the time, YES played cool arrangements, full of dynamics and subtle changes of mood. A piece might change every few bars. There were dead stops, sudden silences, gentle interludes, and raging climaxes.

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Even in their earliest days, YES were like a miniature orchestra. They weren’t pretentious, either. Their music flowed in a swinging style that owed as much to jazz as classical or rock. Anyone with half an ear could appreciate what they were trying to do, although the band did sometimes encounter baffled audiences at their first gigs. “I had seen enough groups to realise there was a need for a more musical approach,” Anderson explains. “We could extend songs and play longer pieces of music, and when we started, we didn’t have any boundaries or barriers.” Their financial barriers were somewhat unburdened by Yorkshire businessman John Roberts, who gave them £500 for equipment and rehearsal-room rentals.

Rehearsals ran through June and July 1968. One of their first shows was at East Mersea Youth Camp, Essex, on August 4, 1968. Few remember much about it now, but the band went down well at the Marquee the next day, performing their own versions of “Eleanor Rigby,” “Every Little Thing,” and “Heaven Is In Your Mind.” They also played songs by The 5th Dimension and Buffalo Springfield – even bits from West Side Story.

Peter Banks: “We wanted the controlled power of a jazz band, lots of light and shade and three-part vocal harmonies. But people were very bemused that we didn’t do our covers like the originals. The whole point was ‘Let’s do it our way.’ Jon was always cracking the whip and planning new things. He was two months ahead of everybody else. He gave the impression of being a mild and gentle hippie, but really he was the motivating force behind the band.”

“I was very aggressive,” Anderson admits. “They used to call me Napoleon. When people turned up late for rehearsals I’d say, ‘I will not stand for this. You’re damned lucky to be in a band, and so let’s get on with it.’ If anybody didn’t want to toe the line, they could move on and do something else. You could not expect to make beautiful music without being rehearsed. But I wasn’t the boss. I was the team captain.” Their earnings increased to £22 a night, but they couldn’t survive much longer on such low wages. Help was at hand. Roy Flynn, manager of The Speakeasy club, had spotted them at another London venue, Blaises, where they’d replaced Sly & The Family Stone at the last minute. This momentous event took place on September 16, 1968.
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Flynn was so enthusiastic about YES‘ performance that he offered to become their manager, on the spot. The next day he provided them with a van and the much­needed Hammond organ. More importantly, he secured them a contract with Atlantic Records through his contacts with label boss Ahmet Ertegun. It was a rare honour for a British band to be signed to such a prestigious company. Overnight, YES joined the ranks of Cream and Led Zeppelin among the giants of rock’s new age.

The band’s next coup was not one but three performances in one year at London’s Royal Albert Hall. A particular highlight was supporting Cream at their farewell performance on November 26, 1968. That show marked the return of Bill Bruford, who had gone back to University (he had been replaced in the interim by Tony O’Riley of The Koobas, who had once toured with The Beatles. Bruford recalls catching YES with O’Riley when they performed at his school: “In fact, it was a bit of a mess. They were in trouble, and I could tell the drummer was struggling. He played a quarter-note behind everyone else!”). Anderson and Squire had pleaded with him to return for the Albert Hall show, and once Bruford had played with the band at a real concert, he was hooked. Roy Flynn moved the YES men into a soon-to-be-famous flat in Munster Road, Fulham, where all the band members and their girlfriends lived, as well as musicians from other groups, like King Crimson. Australian visitor Michael Tait stepped in to put the band on a more organised footing, becoming their loyal tour manager. “They were very well ­behaved lads,” Tait recalls. “They didn’t go around wrecking hotels, like other groups!”

Events now moved with great speed. YES released their first single “Sweetness“/Something’s Coming,” in June 1969, followed by their self-titled-full-length debut in July. Yes was recorded in eight days, with Tony Kaye still learning his way around the new Hammond. Despite these handicaps, the LP boasted a full compliment of glittering arrangements like “Beyond and Before,” “I See You,” “Yesterday and Today,” “Looking Around,” “Harold Land,” (named after Bill’s favourite tenor sax player), “Every Little Thing,” “Sweetness,” and “Survival.”

Onstage they couldn’t yet afford the kind of special effects that would become de rigeur in the ’70s, but they put on quite a show nonetheless. Peter Banks regularly hurled his guitar aloft at the clime of his solo on “I See You.” “I’d go on longer and longer and take all my aggression out on the guitar,” he explains. “I’d throw my guitar in the air and catch it. There were a couple of times when I didn’t! The solo did go on too long, and the band used to complain about it.”

Unfortunately for Banks, his showmanship was regarded as an attempt to upstage his bandmates. Or at least, they felt it intruded on the arrangement. “I remember lots of arguments,” Bill Bruford recalls. “We were very edgy people. But the plan was to conquer the world – which indeed we did!”

The end of 1969 found the band swamped with work, including TV and radio appearances. They also toured abroad extensively. One of their most memorable trips was through Ireland in the the summer of ’69 with The Nice and Bonzo Dog Band. The had all played some well – received shows in Belfast and Dublin, but when the three groups arrived in Cork for a festival, all hell broke loose. The football ground was deserted, because the promoter hadn’t advertised the gig. The only power supply for the outdoor show was an electric-kettle flex held together with matchsticks. Once the power had blown three times, all concert plans were abandoned. A strong smell emanating form the nearby Cork Pork Abattoir was the final straw. The satin-clad rockers sat in the mud and cried with laughter.
YES and the others repaired to the nearest pub, where they performed and began singing “Give Booze A Chance.” the patrons began smashing beer glasses in time to the music, and the Brits fled to an airplane waiting to fly them back to London. As YES crossed the Irish sea by moonlight, the captain announced to the incredulous passengers, “At this moment the Americans are landing on the moon.”

III. We Get Up, We Get Down (1970-1979)

Back in Fulham the band members were still sharing the same apartment. The result was increased tension due to overcrowding and endless financial strain. Chris Squire gained his famed nickname “Fish” from those Munster Road days, as he soaked in the bath for hours while his roommates banged on the bathroom door. There was much late-night partying, and Peter Banks recalls that in Anderson’s prevegetarian days, his favourite dish was bacon, eggs, and chips. He knows this because long after the singer had left the flat, a half-consumed breakfast was found mouldering under a bed.

As pressures mounted, the band realised that changes needed to be made. One was the dismissal of manager Roy Flynn, who explained later, “It was all going pear-shaped.” He left after the release of Time And A Word – a highly ambitious record, but one that failed to dent the all-important U.S. market. It turned out that their New York label representatives assumed YES was some kind of folk outit. In the turmoil that followed, Brian Lane, a skilled negotiator, was invited to take over Flynn’s old spot. Lane would transform the band’s fortunes and put them on the road to superstardom.

Another major transformation resulted from Peter Banks’ departure in May 1970. The friction between him and the others proved to be too much. He was on hand, however, for Time And A Word, released that November. Despite his short stay, Banks’ contribution was crucial. Although technically less than perfect, those first two albums defined the YES approach and created the template for their future development. Banks would later rebound with his own band, Flash.

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With a spot now open in the lineup, Chris Squire got on the phone and put in a call to another guitarist, a man named Steve Howe. He, too, would help alter the band’s fortunes.

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Steve Howe was born in London on April 8, 1947. Raised in Holloway, he was given his first guitar at the age of 12 and spent several months miming to the instrument before he actually got around to playing it. By age 14 he was performing in youth club bands. By the time he left school, he was becoming a professional musician. He first appeared on The Syndicats’ version of “Maybelline,” a side produced by Joe Meek, the man behind The Tornados’ “Telstar.” Howe later played with vocalist Keith West in The In Crowd, which then evolved into psychedelic heroes Tomorrow. But after an underground hit with “My White Bicycle,” Tomorrow reached a dead end. After a stint with the short-lived Bodast, the guitarist received the call from Squire, inviting him to join YES. He was delighted. It seemed like his ideal group.

“They encouraged me so much, and they wanted input from me as a musician,” Howe said later. “They didn’t just get me in to strum along, and so I was able to contribute to things like ‘Close To The Edge‘ and ‘Siberian Khatru.'”

Howe made his debut YES appearance at London’s Lyceum ballroom on March 21, 1970, on a heavy rock bill with Black Sabbath and Uriah Heep. Despite such daunting competition, the band astounded the audience with the new material they’d spent that summer rehearsing at a cottage in Devon. Those sessions produced “Yours Is No Disgrace,” “Starship Trooper,” “I’ve Seen All Good People,” and “Perpetual Change,” all destined for the band’s third LP, The Yes Album (engineered by Eddie Offord, who manned the YES boards through Relayer).

Released in March 1971, the record introduced Howe’s dynamic guitar; apart from his lead work, acoustic numbers like “Clap” became showstopping live features. He contributed greatly to the band’s material. The Yes Album reached #7 on the U.K. charts and finally broke YES in America, where it peaked at #40.

Yesmusic was like the aftermath of the Big Bang: a tremendous amount of heat and energy, expanding in all directions. By now, rock’s vast audience had discovered YES, and the band was winning both critical and popular acclaim. Armed with £5,000 worth of new equipment, they set off on their first British tour of large venues, followed by a 28-day European jag with Iron Butterfly. It would be an educational experience. YES liked the American band’s superior PA system so much they offered to buy it.

However, they had an even better sound system by the time they made their Stateside debut, supporting Jethro Tull in April 1971. YES struck it big, especially on the East Coast. Recalls Chris Squire: “We had a lot of DJ support, and a lot of fans showed up who knew what we were doing.”

They played dozens of college dates, often supporting unsuitable acts, but it was all building up to massive local acceptance. After their second U.S. tour they were selling out major festival and stadium gigs. As the stage show grew, Roy Clair of Clair Brothers Audio Enterprises became their “sound doctor.” He fondly remembers those early U.S. shows: “We heard the buzz, and all over the States people were saying, ‘There is this incredible new group from England.’ They were so talented, and the music was so different. We developed a special new system to give them a really big sound. The YES audience was like a Grateful Dead audience – really loyal.”

To complement Roy Clair’s audio expertise, YES added an elaborate light show, developed by Michael Tait. Many strange experiments took place in the Tait bathtub with dry ice and smoke machines. When the band eventually unleashed “Close To The Edge,” cheering audiences were wowed by a dazzling display of smoke, mirrors, and laser beams.

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In the midst of this increasing complexity and sophistication, Anderson and Squire were keen to expand the use of the newly introduced synthesizer. Tony Kaye’s chunky Hammond organ was deemed somewhat dated and inflexible, although it had helped define the group’s original sound. His exit in August 1971 was greatly regretted by fans, but it led to the arrival of a dazzling new YES hero – multikeyboard wizard Rick Wakeman.

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A flamboyant character, tall, blond, and witty, Wakeman was a virtuoso pianist with a classical background. He rose to fame with folk rockers The Strawbs, but he also had a parallel career as one of England’s top session musicians. Among his many credits was playing mellotron on David Bowie’s Space Oddity back in 1969. Wakeman made his YES debut on Fragile and quickly became a favourite among fans, as much for his outgoing personality and showmanship as his musical skills. He certainly brought a sense of humour.

Rick Wakeman was born in Perivale, Middlesex, England, on May 18, 1949. He began taking piano lessons at age seven and went to the Royal College of Music after leaving grammar school. He was expected to become a classical concert pianist, but he’d already starting jamming with rock bands. Dismissed from college for neglecting his studies, Wakeman plunged into session work. Apart from his stint with Bowie, he also played the piano on Cat Stevens’ “Morning Has Broken.” He joined The Strawbs in April 1970 but left in July of the following year. “I just couldn’t survive financially,” he explained. “We were only on £20 a week!” Wakeman was sleeping off a late session when Chris Squire called him at three o’clock one morning, asking if he’d like to join YES. Said Rick, interrupting Squire’s chatter: “Oi – do you know what time it is?!” But within days the Keyboardist had enlisted and was helping to create new songs like “Roundabout” and “Heart Of The Sunrise.”

Another new arrival at this time was Roger Dean, a highly creative designer famed for his distinctive album art. Dean developed a suitably elaborate and fantastical style for YES, creating the covers for Fragile, Close To The Edge, and Tales From Topographic Oceans, as well as their most distinctive group logo, which first appeared on Edge. Together with his brother, Martyn, Dean would also create the spectacular scenery that provided the ambience for YES‘ increasingly elaborate stage shows.

Anderson, Squire, Wakeman, Howe, and Bruford seemed like the dream team Jon and Chris had always wanted. The result was an unprecedented wave of critical acclaim and the cheers of a growing army of fans. Their albums went gold, and their singles began shooting up the charts instead of languishing in obscurity. The underground band that once drove to gigs in a beat-up old van now traveled in limos and jets to perform in massive stadiums. This reversal of fortunes was completed with the success of “Roundabout,” the upbeat and exuberant opening cut from Fragile that shot up to #13 on the U.S. Billboard chart in March 1972. YES‘ increasing commercial success did nothing to dampen their ardour for remaining creative and cutting-edge. If anything they became more experimental, setting themselves even more difficult targets. Nowhere was this more evident than on Fragile‘s ambitious follow-up, Close To The Edge.

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Bill Bruford remembers that the creation of this fifth YES album was especially rough. “We started recording a piece of music, got halfway through, and nobody knew what the heck the conclusion was,” he says. “We could only figure the music out by doing it in the studio. There were no computers, so tape editing was the thing.” Rick Wakeman agrees: “We did an effects tapeloop for ‘Close To The Edge‘ that must have been 40 feet long. Now you could do it all with one sample.” The complexity of pieces like “Total Mass Retain” (one of four suites in “Close To The Edge“) and “Siberian Khatru” caused the musicians and engineer Eddie Offord no end of grief as they struggled to piece it all together.

There was much bickering over the meanings of lyrics and even song titles. But it was a necessary evil of the time consuming process where an idea was turned into reality. “And You And I” was just one composition that made it all worthwhile. As Jon Anderson explained: “We’ve got a long way to go with our music. Nobody is getting lazy, and we’re not resting on our laurels… we’re only just beginning.”

In the midst of this frenzied period, the band’s impetuous young drummer decided he wanted out. YES fans were shocked by Bruford’s departure after the completion of Close To The Edge. His bandmates were also disappointed, as they felt they were on the cusp of even greater success. Squire appeared undaunted: “Bill leaving was very odd. But YES seem to thrive on setbacks. The more that gets thrown in our face, the harder we work.” Bruford had already been in discussions with guitarist Robert Fripp and felt that his musical future lay with Fripp’s King Crimson. “I was thrilled by YES, and it was my favourite band,” Bruford says. “But I was also dying to join King Crimson, and I knew the change would do me good.” Bill’s input had shaped YES‘ early sound and style, but his July 1972 exit paved the way for Alan White, the only other drummer the band has employed throughout its history. He became a tower of strength, whose powerful style has given each YES incarnation its backbeat and confidence.

White joined just as Close To The Edge was rocketing up both the British and American charts. But even without his YES stint, the drummer boasted one fantastic resume. Alan White was born in Pelton, Co. Durham, on June 14, 1949. His uncle, a drummer, gave him his first kit at the age of 12. White took a lot of lessons and after three months joined his first group, The Downbeats, based in Newcastle. With the tireless young man pounding skins seven nights a week, he was spotted and written about in the local newspaper as “the youngest drummer in England.” He continued to play throughout his school years, and by the time he was 17, he was backing British pop singer Billy Fury on cabaret dates. He went to Germany for awhile just missing Jon Anderson, then touring with The Warriors). Back home in England he played with Happy Magazine, the Plastic Ono Band, and Ginger Baker’s Air Force. He also performed with George Harrison, Joe Cocker, Terry Reid, and Alan Price. His biggest thrill was working with John Lennon for more than two years, playing on the sublime “Imagine,” as well as “Give Peace A Chance” and “How Do You Sleep?” – which certainly impressed the Beatles-loving Yesmen. “It was mind blowing playing with John, and I was living in a dream world,” White says of his tenure with Lennon. “It was like I was part of history.” Now he would help make history, plunging into an entirely different world.
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The year 1973 had already been a momentous one for the band, finding them touring Japan, America, and Australia. Rick Wakeman had released a solo instrumental album (The Six Wives Of Henry VIII), which proved a surprise success. In May Atlantic released the triple “live” Yessongs, the group’s biggest selling album thus far.

The band was now treated like rock royalty. In the 1972 Melody Maker Readers’ Poll they won Best BAnd and many other categories, dominating their closest rivals, Led Zeppelin. Then, during the summer, they began work on their sixth studio album.

Tales From Topographic Oceans (represented on this set by “The Revealing Science Of God – Dance Of The Dawn“) was largely devised by Jon Anderson and Steve Howe and written during spare moments on tour. It was based on Anderson’s understanding of the Shastric Scriptures, which he’d read about in the cult book Autobiography Of A Yogi. Everything about the album seemed larger than life, from the challenging themes to the artwork. Roger Dean had designed a lavish gatefold sleeve that complemented the music.

The controversial double-LP was finally released in January 1974. The band performed the Topographic songs at two shows at London’s Rainbow Theatre that same month. The audience was slow to grasp the new music, and there was tension backstage and the group debated the wisdom of hitting the public with such a heavy concept album. Adding insult to injury, Rick Wakeman did not conceal his disquiet about Topographic, revealing that he hadn’t enjoyed the recording sessions.

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Yet despite all the criticism and debate, the “difficult” Topographic, with its sprawling themes, was a success. It easily went gold, topping the U.K. Album chart for two weeks and hitting #6 in Billboard. In February 1974 the band played two nights at New York’s Madison Square Garden, and the blockbuster show epitomised the summit of the “supergroup” era. Despite all this, Wakeman could not conceal his lack of enthusiasm for music that seemed devoid of much space for keyboards. One night during the U.K. tour, he appeared onstage eating a chicken curry. His personal roadie thoughtfully delivered it during a lull in the performance. “I don’t believe it – he’s eating a curry!” gasped the astonished lead singer. The writing – or at least the vindaloo – was on the wall, on the floor, and all over the grand piano.

Even if Wakeman and some of the critics weren’t overly keen on Topographic, it certainly provided the theme for YES‘ most elaborate stage show. Roger and Martyn Dean created a spectacular set, composed of illuminated translucent fibreglass landscapes that brought the album cover to life. Although the concept of such scenery has since been unmercifully parodied in This Is Spinal Tap, at the time it all seemed very… illuminating.

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After YES‘ European Topographic dates, the band was hit by another split: Wakeman, whose solo career seemed to be taking off, was leaving. He was summarily replaced by Swiss-born Patrick Moraz, another brilliant keyboard virtuoso. The charming and cooperative Moraz, who preferred fondue to vindaloo, had come to the band’s attention through his work with Refugee. He gave up his trio to join YES in time for their next album, Relayer, released in December 1974.

Moraz was born on June 24, 1948, in Morges, Switzerland. He studied violin and piano as a child and began composing at the age of five. At 17 he won a prize as a jazz soloist, and in 1965 toured Europe with a group supporting tenor sax legend John Coltrane. Moraz first saw YES in Montreux, Switzerland, in 1969.

At the time he had his own progressive rock group, Mainhorse, with musicians in England. In 1973 he teamed up with Lee Jackson and Brian Davison (formerly of The Nice) in Refugee. Moraz joined Yes in August 1974, explaining, “I was always fascinated by their music and thought they were a brilliant band. When I first heard ‘Sound Chaser‘ I was blown away.” (In fact, he was once almost literally blown away by the band’s manager, Brian Lane, who, while speeding to a meeting on a rain-soaked day, nearly knocked down the new keyboard player with his car. “I don’t think he recognised me,” Moraz said.)

Luckily, Moraz survived the encounter and toured with YES from 1974 to 1976, leaving to join The Moody Blues. He made a powerful contribution to Relayer, a single album with only three tracks (all blockbusters): “The Gates Of Delirium,” “Sound Chaser,” and “To Be Over.”

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During the 1976 Bicentennial year, the band played a celebration concert at the vast JFK Stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, before a crowd of 150,000. During that U.S. tour they played to a total of one million people. As the champagne flowed and the convoys of trucks drove YES and their entourage across America, nobody realised this was the Indian summer of progressive rock. A year later came (cue dry ice and hideous green lighting FX)… the birth of the Sex Pistols. Once punk rock took root, with its challenging social philosophies, the idea of concept albums, prog­rock epics, and long keyboard solos were rendered obsolete. “Anarchy In The U.K.” certainly dropped a bomb on the British music business and destabilised many great bands, including Led Zeppelin, Emerson, Lake & Palmer, and Genesis. Within a few years, YES itself were almost brought to destruction.

Yes play JFK Stadium, 12 June 1976

Yes play JFK Stadium, 12 June 1976

Even when the punk dust had settled, the role of the creative musician was greatly reduced. And it stayed that way for many long, dark years. Henceforth, producers, DJs, marketing departments, stylists, and accountants would take dominant roles in deciding what the public would hear. This didn’t much suit a music-driven band like YES, accustomed to controlling all the creative aspects of their work.

Yet even during the music industry’s great Stalinist purges, when Britain was a bleak cultural wasteland, YES refused to bite the bullet. They toured, topped popularity polls and album charts, and laughed in the face of doom. They even brought back Rick Wakeman, whose personal popularity with fans remained unabated. He had enjoyed great success with a number of solo albums, but the strain of putting on his own spectacular shows caused the keyboardist a heart scare. So it was a rather more subdued Rick who returned to YES later in 1976.

The band had started work on Going For The One in Switzerland, without Patrick. A refreshingly bright album, it topped the U.K. charts and yielded “Wonderous Stories,” a hit single that reached #7 in the U.K. in September 1977. All seemed well, but the next album, Tormato, was less successful. Tracks like “Don’t Kill The Whale,” and “Circus Of Heaven” contrasted with “Arriving UFO,” a superior piece by any standard. Even so, it was a confusing time, a mood epitomised by the album cover, which featured a tomato splattered across the artwork.

In 1979 the band went to Paris to record an album with Queen producer Roy Thomas Baker. His control-room cries of “Take-ee-poos” seemed to irritate the Yesmen, and Rick Wakeman in particular didn’t like the new material. (Those rough sessions yielded “Tango” and “Never Done Before,” two tracks appearing here for the first time ever.) “After Tormato everything started to go horribly wrong, because punk was hitting big time, and YES were out of fashion,” he says. “We were trying to record the new album in France, and there was a dreadful animosity. Jon and I had written a lot of stuff, which wasn’t liked by the other guys, and they didn’t even turn up to the studios. It all became a mess.”

Then came the unthinkable: The voice of YES left the band. Jon Anderson, who had been the guiding force with Chris Squire since day one, was gone, along with Wakeman. How could both men possibly quit after so much hard work? The truth was long and complex, rooted in finance, band politics, and loss of inspiration.

IV. Take Me Into the Fire (1980-1994)

As the ’80s loomed, YES seemed destined to dissolve in disarray; but astonishingly, they survived yet another upheaval and came back, revived, with fresh blood. this had happened before, but not quite on this scale. Who could possibly replace Jon and Rick? The answer came in the form of two musicians who happened to be managed by Brian Lane, the man who guided YES through the start of the ’70s.

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Lane oversaw The Buggles, a newly succesful pop group featuring singer and bass player Trevor Horn (born July 15, 1949, in Hertfordshire, England) and keyboard player Geoff Downes (born in Stockport, Greater Manchester, August 1952), a classically trained musician. They had scored a groundbreaking hit with “Video Killed The Radio Star” and seemed much more attuned to the trendy new decade. But as luck would have it, both men loved YES. Although the Buggles and YES seemed a mismatch, these newcomers had much to offer. Howe, Squire, and White welcomed them into their ranks. All they had to do now was come up with a new album, fulfil dates on a prebooked American tour and win over largely hostile fans.

The first result of their labours was 1980’s Drama, an album with surprisingly tough songs like “Machine Messiah.” Drama turned out to be an appropriate title. “It was fraught, manic time,” Geoff Downes recalls. “YES have more crazy moments than the average rock band.” All difficulties aside, the album shot to #2 on the U.K. chart and #18 in the States.

“The final upheaval was all about saving the band,” Steve Howe opines. “The change of lineup was hard, but things were not so good for YES. The album sales had dipped, and if we wanted to continue, we had to invest in the group.”

Chris Squire: “Jon wanted to go off and be a solo artist like Rick. He wanted to get his own backing band and tour. The rest of us were left thinking, We’d better find a new keyboard player and singer!

Anderson had his own reasons for leaving. “By 1979 the band was emotionally very tired,” he explains. “We hadn’t stopped work since the beginning, and we’ve been on the road for over ten years. We were stuck in a twilight zone.”

Nevertheless, the band struggled on sans Jon and Rick. Trevor Horn became the lead singer, with Geoff on keyboards. A simple task, one might have thought. In America, audiences were just happy to see YES back again. The 44-date North American tour was sold out and capped by three nights at Madison Square Garden in September 1980.

But back home in England, things weren’t so pleasant. Partisan fans gave voice to their feelings, and they weren’t always too complimentary. Indeed, they were prone to shout, “We want Jon Anderson!” at the crucial moment when the new vocalist was about to hit a high note. As far as Horn was concerned, the “dream gig” was becoming a nightmare.

“The Buggles period was confusing for everybody,” Squire says. “Brian Lane said, ‘Don’t tell anyone we’ve changed the singer and the keyboard player!’ So we just showed up, and there were two different people in the band. And the audiences were saying, ‘What is going on?'”

The stress of touring was too much for Trevor Horn, and matters came to a head after the tour with the eruption of many claims, counterclaims, and arguments. The group parted company with Brian Lane, as did The Buggles. Lane promptly responded with Asia, a brand-new supergroup with Steve Howe and Geoff Downes teamed with John Wetton and ELP’s Carl Palmer. So now Steve and Geoff were gone as well, leaving Chris Squire and Alan White to pick up the pieces.

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The story of YES might have ended here, in April 1981, but much to Steve Howe’s surprise and chagrin, the band was secretly preparing a comeback – without him. After experiments with a project called Cinema (which might have included Jimmy Page on guitar), YES re-formed in 1983 with a talented new guitarist and songwriter named Trevor Rabin. Rabin was born on January 13, 1954, in Johannesburg, South Africa, where he achieved considerable success with his group Rabbit. He moved to England in 1978 to record four solo albums, then ventured to the States, settling in Los Angeles, California.

After a series of meetings, it was also decided to invite former YES keyboard man Tony Kaye back into the fold. An even bigger surprise was the reconciliation between Squire and Jon Anderson, who had not spoken for some time after the failed Paris sessions. In any case, Anderson had been working with Greek keyboard wiz Vangelis. When Jon was inveigled into listening to the Cinema demos, he agreed to return ­ but only if Cinema became YES. “Jon came down and sang on a couple of tracks,” Alan White recalls, “and there was the new YES!”

The ’80s incarnation was a revelation. The band came back stronger than ever with 1983’s 90125. Its diamond-hard contemporary sound was produced by Trevor Horn, working together with Trevor Rabin, who cowrote “Owner Of A Lonely Heart” with Horn, Squire, and Anderson. “We finished the new album with Jon singing,” Squire says, “and 90125 was our biggest album ever and sold 8 million copies. It was amazing’ We were given a rebirth.” Alan White: “[‘Owner Of A Lonely Heart‘] was the biggest single the band ever had…. We kept a lot of stalwart YES fans and made a lot of new ones.”

90125 was a watershed in the band’s career, surprising those who’d cynically written them off. The new sound was fresh, dynamic, and dance-oriented, and the music was bold and inventive – and popular, to boot. “Owner Of A Lonely Heart” went #1 Pop Stateside; its follow-up, “Leave It,” reached #24. YES‘ fortunes were also bolstered visually by the “Lonely Heart” video, which became a staple on the then ­ new but always influential MTV cable channel. As the album topped the charts, the band embarked on their 1984 world tour, playing over 200 shows in 15 months on the road.

If YES-watchers thought the band had finally settled down for the remainder of the decade, they were due more shocks. Work began in 1985 on the next album, which took much longer than anticipated. The two Trevors bickered over the material and the production. In the end Trevor Horn left, and Tony Kaye dropped out.

Finally released in 1987 Big Generator boosted some fine performances, incuding the radio favourite “Rhythm of Love,” “Shoot High, Aim Low,” and “Love Will Find A Way,” a superior YES ballad. The album did well enough but did not produce 90125 – type numbers. After this experience, Trevor Rabin stepped back to concentrate again on his solo work. Perhaps he guessed that strange moves were afoot.

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As indeed they were. Jon Anderson had become unhappy with his role in the “new” YES and felt he was taking too much of a backseat. He quietly left the group, for a seond time, in 1987 and formed a new unit that seemed like a calculated move to revive the original YES concept. Although he welcomed the success of 90125, he didn’t think it represented the band’s true spirit. This new one would, however, since it included original Yesmen Bill Bruford, Rick Wakeman, and Steve Howe, hot footed from Asia.

Meanwhile Chris Squire, Alan White, and Trevor Rabin also regrouped as YES, so there were now effectively two YESes: one based in Los Angeles, the other in Europe. Anderson, Bruford, Wakeman, Howe (Arista) was released in June 1989, together with the “Brother Of Mine” single (the song is featured here in its epic form), which Bruford says, “was all but a hit.” However, when they toured with “An Evening Of Yes Music,” there was a dispute with the other YES, the “YES of the West.” This was finally resolved, and ideas for a second ABWH album were scrapped. All parties instead came together for a new album, Union. This unexpected move united Jon, Bill, Tony, Trevor, Rick, Chris, Alan, and Steve. Only Peter Banks was missing from the reunion, left out at the last minute, much to his disappointment. And so these eight musicians took part in the unique 1991 Union tour – including Rick Wakeman, back onstage with the band, for the third time. This monster YES performed on a revolving stage, allowing audiences to see Jon Anderson floating in the middle, surrounded by two keyboard players, two guitarists, and a brace of drummers, drifting roundabout. It was the ultimate deja vu experience.

Steve Howe left after this frequently emotional tour to develop his solo career and rejoin Asia as a special guest. By 1992 Rick, Bill, and Steve had all dropped out, thus the Union concept was no more.

But it still wasn’t the end of the line. The “YES West” lineup consisting of Squire, Anderson, Kaye, White, and Rabin cut the heavily computerised Talk. (Victory) in 1994. It was quite a bold step, distinguished by the extended work “Endless Dream” and such pieces as “Real Love” and “The Calling.” Not all YES fans embraced it, however, and then Trevor Rabin exited to concentrate on writing film music.

V. The Light Is Burning Brightly,
Brighter Than Before (1995-2000)

The 90’s had brought about another shift in YES. By then the music scene had undergone many drastic changes, with grunge and metal bands like Nirvana and Guns N’ Roses dominating most of the decade. Remarkably, given the age gap between the veteren band and younger audiences, there was still a place for YES. Suddenly it became hip again to listen to the longest-lasting and most respected of all the ’70s survivors. Their music was heard on the soundtrack of new movies, most famously in Vincent Gallo’s Buffalo ’66 (1998) which made effective use of “Heart Of The Sunrise” and “Sweetness.” Fans discussed in fine detail the band’s personalities and movements and analysed and dissected every note of every album they’d ever recorded, with Internet chat rooms buzzing with news, views, and opinions. Everyone seemed hungry for a piece of YES.

The years of rows and arguments about money, music, management, and inner politics seemed over. Now YES just wanted to get back to work. Anderson, Squire, and White reunited with Wakeman and Howe to record fresh shows at The Fremont Theatre in San Luis Obispo, California, cuts of which appeared on Keys To Ascension (1996), along with two new studio tracks. The same lineup followed with 1997’s Keys To Ascension 2, featuring the epic length “Mind Drive.”

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But, following the second recording, Rick Wakeman decided he didn’t want to go on tour. So after much discussion, the band recruited feisty Russian pianist Igor Khoroshev, having been impressed with the young man’s demo tape. Khoroshev, the second new recruit in a year, was the 14th and perhaps most exotic member of YES. Born in Moscow on July 14, 1965, he listened to their records as a young music student. Patrick Moraz was one of his favourite YES keyboard players. Khoroshev moved to the U.S. in 1991, settling in Boston, Massachusetts. After gaining experience with The Cars’ Ben Orr and Boston’s Brad Delp, Kohoroshev auditioned for YES and overwhelmed them by performing one of the band’s more complicated arrangements on one keyboard.
YES also summoned the services of additional guitarist Billy Sherwood (born March 14, 1965, in Las Vegas, Nevada), who helped expand their sound. Sherwood, the band’s first American, wrote songs with Chris and was a natural choice to join full-time in October 1997. “I was a die-hard YES fan and well-versed in their history,” Sherwood said after becoming a member. “It was the first time they’s had two guitarists onstage since the Union tour.

Together they all cut the commercial-sounding Open Your Eyes (featuring “Universal Garden,” included here) in 1998, packaged with a shiny new Roger Dean Logo. As Sherwood said, “[It] wasn’t a smash, but it got a lot of airplay and helped heighten the awareness of YES in the ’90s.” With fresh management in place in the Left Bank Organisation and the Eagle Rock label ready to back them, YES could face the world once more.

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The band bid farewell to the ’90s with The Ladder, released in September 1999. Bruce Fairbairn, famed for his work with Kiss, Aerosmith, and The Cranberries, produced the 11-track album, which featured the stellar ballad “If Only You Knew” and pieces influenced by reggae and world music like “Face To Face,” and “The Messenger,” a Bob Marley Tribute. The Ladder demonstrated a willingness to take risks and explore new territory, and Fairbairn had encouraged this attitude. Tragically, the 49-year-old producer died of a heart attack at his Vancouver home that May; his body was discover after he failed to turn up for a mixing session for the album. The band was stunned. Howe and Anderson performed the song “Nine Voices” at his memorial service, and the group dedicated The Ladder to his memory.

YES was back on the road in Europe during the year 2000, playing material from The Ladder, as well as their all-time classic hits. “We don’t like to live in the past, but we do like to play the older material and keep it authentic,” Steve Howe avowed. “It’s pretty breathtaking to be able to play place like the Royal Albert Hall, London, where we started out in the ’60s. When I joined the group in 1970, I never thought it would last so long. I had no idea YES would become such a chunk of rock history”

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VI. Epilogue

The new millennium finds YES continuing to thrive, experiment, and undergo radical changes. Billy Sherwood and Igor Khoroshev both left in 2000, and the remaining core recorded their latest album, Magnification, the following year. It was a landmark musical revelation. In the absence of a keyboardist, the band enlisted an entire orchestra, under the guidance of acclaimed composer Larry Groupe YES also embarked that year on a highly ambitious and highly successful concert series with a full orchestra.

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The YES Symphonic Tour was the culmination of another long-held dream. They worked with the youthful European Festival Orchestra and filmed a show in Amsterdam for a 2-hour-plus DVD special. Some of the band’s best-loved themes, including “Long Distance Runaround,” “And You And I,” and “I’ve Seen All Good People,” were performed with the orchestra, as well as stirring versions of “Roundabout” and “Owner Of A Lonely Heart.” Yes also used the opportunity to revisit songs they hadn’t performed in several years, like “The Gates Of Delirium,” “Ritual – Nous Sommes Du Soleil,” and “Close To The Edge.”

As the year 2002 dawned, the latest rumours were that Rick Wakeman might return to the fold. It wouldn’t be surprising. After 34 years of cosmic exploration, there is still time and space for yet more adventures aboard the Starship Yes.

Rock journalist Chris Welch began documenting the exploring English music scene as a reporter and feature writer for Melody Maker, the famous weekly British music newspaper. Welch left the Maker in 1980 and later became reviews editor for English metal mag Kerrang!, followed by a stint as editor of Metal Hammer before “going solo” in 1993. The prolific Welch’s slate of bestselling artist biographies include the landmark Hendrix: A Biography (still in print after 30 years), as well as career chronicles of Tina Turner, Adam Ant, Paul McCartney, Led Zeppelin, and, of course YES. His Close To The Edge: The Story Of Yes was published by Omnibus Press in 1999. His latest offering, Ginger Geezer (Fourth Estate, 2001), coauthored with Lucian Randall, documents the life of former Bonzo Dog Band singer Vivian Stanshall. Today Welch lives in Kent, England, with his wife, Marilyne, and son, Steven.

Lyrics

Click on the song title to view the lyrics.

EVERY LITTLE THING

When I’m walking beside her
People tell me I’m lucky.
Yes, I know I’m a lucky guy.
I remember the first time
I was lonely without her.
Can’t stop thinking about her now.
Every little thing she does,
She does for me, yeah.
And you know the things she does,
She does for me
When I’m with her I’m happy
Just to know that she loves me.
Yes, I know that she loves me now.
There is one thing I’m sure of,
I will love her forever.
For I know love will never die.
Every little thing she does,
She does for me, yeah.
And you know the things she does,
She does for me
Every little thing she does,
She does for me, yeah.
And you know the things she does,
She does for me
Every little thing.


WRITTEN BY

John Lennon/Paul McCartney


SWEETNESS

She brings the sunshine to a rainy afternoon;
She puts the sweetness in, stirs it with a spoon.
She watches for my moods, never brings me down;
She puts the sweetness in, all around.
She knows just what to say to make me feel so good inside.
And when I’m all alone I feel I don’t want to hide, hide, hide.
Today she brought me in, told me where she’d been;
She put my mind at rest, put the sweetness in.
I’ll ask her for some time to go and look around;
She puts the sweetness in with a sound.
She knows just what to say to make a sunny day.
And when I’m all alone I really don’t feel that way.
Tell me, how would you feel with no world of your own and nobody to
hold?
I just can’t see the way; I’m so glad it’s today and you’re here, you’re here.
She brings the sunshine to a rainy afternoon;
She puts the sweetness in, stirs it with a spoon.
She watches for my moods, never brings me down;
She puts the sweetness in, all around.
She knows just what to say to make me feel so good inside.
And when I’m all alone I really don’t feel that way.
Oh how I need her so,
I know she’ll never go. Doo doo doo doot n doo.
She’ll never leave me, believe me, no. Doo doo doo doot n doo.
She’ll never go, no no no no no no no no no no no no.


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Clive Bailey


SURVIVAL

Sunshine is creeping in and somewhere in a field a life begins,
An egg too proud to rape the beginning of a shape of things to come,
That starts the run, life has begun, fly fast the gun.
The Mother flew too late and life within the egg was left to fate,
not really knowing how the world outside would take it when it came,
and life’s the same for things we aim, are we to blame?
Don’t doubt the fact that there’s life within you,
yesterday’s endings will tomorrow’s life give you,
all that dies, dies for a reason,
to put its strength into the Season,
Survival, Survival,
They take away as we give,
The livings right to live,
the livings right to know.
The egg breaks all is out, the crawling bird begins to scream and shout,
Where is the parent bird, a loneliness arose and heard its name-
ring in for life begins, survival win, survivals sin.
So soon the evening comes with it runs the aching
fear of hate could Someone still remain who thinks he
still could gain by escaping fate? it’s much too late,
don’t underrate, appreciate.
And we’re all going
And we’re all going
And we’re all going somewhere!


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson


THEN

And in a time that’s closer
Life will be even bolder then
Souls will be complicated
Life will be consummated then
Hearts will be brought together
Soon in our minds forever then
As long as we see
There’s only us who can change it
Only us to rearrange it
At the start of a new kind of day
Love is the only answer
Hate is the root of cancer then
Truth is just for the being
And there’s the sight for seeing then
Thoughts will be thought together
Soon in our minds forever then
As long as we see
There’s only us who can change it
Only us to rearrange it
At the start of a new kind of day
And in a time that’s closer
Life will be even bolder then
Love is the only answer
Hate is the root of cancer then
Thoughts will be thought together
Soon in our minds forever then


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson


SWEET DREAMS

Sweet dreams can solve the future,
Sweet dreams provide the past.
Sweet things within your makeup;
These things will always last,
These things will make
Sweet dreams of conversation,
Sweet dreams of love affection.
Sweet words within your makeup;
Sweet words of things to
Come on and write your letter,
You know it will be better anyhow.
You’re gonna laugh again,
You’re gonna smile again,
You’re gonna love again.
Sweet dreams are born inside you,
Sweet dreams are born to last.
Sweet thoughts within your makeup;
These thoughts will always last,
These thoughts will always last.
Come on and write your letter,
You know it will be better anyhow.
You’re gonna laugh again,
You’re gonna smile again,
You’re gonna love again.
Sweet dreams can solve the future,
Sweet dreams provide the past.
Sweet dreams can solve the future,
Sweet dreams provide the past.


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/David Foster


ASTRAL TRAVELLER

And in the ruins of the balloon
Stood a man with glasses held high
Wondering when to do it again
Have another fly into the sky
Somewhere flying high
Astral traveller
Leaving without her
Wandering where lights go
Leave out the body load
Once in the air, people who dare
Get a great respect in being
Heavenly flight, wondrous night
And all the sights worth seeing
Just believe in
Astral traveller
Leaving without her
Wandering where lights go
Leave out the body load
Once in the air, people who dare
Get a great respect in being
Heavenly flight, wondrous night
And all the sights worth seeing
Just believe in
Astral traveller
Leaving without her
Wandering where lights go
Leave out the body load


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson


TIME AND A WORD

In the morning when you rise,
Do you open up your eyes, see what I see?
Do you see the same things ev’ry day?
Do you think of a way to start the day
Getting things in proportion?
Spread the news and help the world go ’round.
Have you heard of a time that will help us get it together again?
Have you heard of the word that will stop us going wrong?
Well, the time is near and the word you’ll hear
When you get things in perspective.
Spread the news and help the word go round.
There’s a time and the time is now and it’s right for me,
It’s right for me, and the time is now.
There’s a word and the word is love and it’s right for me,
It’s right for me, and the word is love.
Have you heard of a time that will help get it together again?
Have you heard of the word that will stop us going wrong?
Well, the time is near and the word you’ll hear
When you get things in perspective.
Spread the news and help the word go round.
There’s a time and the time is now and it’s right for me,
It’s right for me, and the time is now.
There’s a word and the word is love and it’s right for me,
It’s right for me, and the word is love.


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/David Foster


DEAR FATHER

Here are the books of Luke
You need them to open the seed
To see what goes on in the world
Here in my mind
Catch the wind and hold on tight
To what we’ll find
And hear what goes on in the world
Here is all you see
Everything is made for you
From me
If there’s anything you’d like to say
That could help me in any way
‘Cause I’ve been waiting for so long for you to come along
Help me on that day
When you take over all the things
Heaven has made for you
Is there anything you think you should know
Is there anything before I go?
Dear Father
I’m hungry, I’m cold
Dear Father
Feeling terribly old
Dear Father
I don’t think I can see
I’m not feeling good like I think I should
They’re on their own, needing a face, a place
Hope and mind, a home
To see what goes on in the world
They’re who you need
To show them why they’re wrong, oh why indeed
We need to go on in the world
Here is all you see
Everything is made for you
From me
If there’s any complication that
You’d like to talk over with me about
‘Cause I’ve been waiting for so long for you to come along
We could work it all out
When you take over all the things
Heaven has made for you
Is there anything you think you should know
Is there anything before I go?
Dear Father
You must be putting me on
Dear Father
‘Cause most of their minds are gone
Dear Father
They will not understand me
I’m not feeling good like I think I should
Dear Father
Can I give it a miss
Dear Father
‘Cause I’m not ready for this
Dear Father
I don’t think I can see
I’m not feeling good like I think I should
Dear Father
Won’t you leave me alone
Dear Father
Won’t you let me go home
Dear Father
I don’t think I could see
Dear Father
Lord, they’d crucify me
Dear Father
I just couldn’t do that
Dear Father
‘Cause that’s not where it’s at now


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire


YOURS IS NO DISGRACE

Yesterday a morning came, a smile upon your face.
Caesar’s palace, morning glory, silly human race,
On a sailing ship to nowhere, leaving any place,
If the summer change to winter, yours is no disgrace.
Battleships confide in me and tell me where you are,
Shining, flying, purple wolfhound, show me where you are,
Lost in summer, morning, winter, travel very far,
Lost in musing circumstances, that’s just where you are.
Yesterday a morning came, a smile upon your face.
Caesar’s palace, morning glory, silly human race,
On a sailing ship to nowhere, leaving any place,
If the summer change to winter, yours is no,
Yours is no disgrace.
Yours is no disgrace.
Yours is no disgrace.
Death defying, mutilated armies scatter the earth,
Crawling out of dirty holes, their morals, their morals disappear.
Yesterday a morning came, a smile upon your face.
Caesar’s palace, morning glory, silly human, silly human race,
On a sailing ship to nowhere, leaving any place,
If the summer change to winter, yours is no,
Yours is no disgrace.


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Steve Howe/Tony Kaye/Bill Bruford


CLAP

[Instrumental]


WRITTEN BY

Steve Howe


PERPETUAL CHANGE

I see the cold mist in the night
And watch the hills roll out of sight.
I watch in ev’ry single way,
Inside out, outside in, ev’ry day.
The sun can warm the coldest dawn
And move the movement on the lawn.
I learn in ev’ry single day,
Inside out, outside in, ev’ry way.
And there you are,
Making it up but you’re sure that it is a star,
And boy you’ll see
It’s an illusion shining down in front of me,
And then you’ll say
Even in time we shall control the day,
When what you’ll see
Deep inside base controlling you and me.
And one peculiar point I see,
As one of many ones of me.
As truth is gathered, I rearrange,
Inside out, outside in, inside out, outside in,
Perpetual change.
And there you are,
Saying we have the moon, so now the stars,
When all you see
Is near disaster gazing down on you and me,
And there you’re standing,
Saying we have the whole world in our hands,
When all you’ll see,
Deep inside the world’s controlling you and me.
You’ll see perpetual change.
You’ll see perpetual change.
And there you are,
Making it up but you’re sure that it is a star,
And boy you’ll see
It’s an illusion shining down in front of me,
And then you’ll say
Even in time we shall control the day,
When what you’ll see
Deep inside base controlling you and me.
As mist and sun are both the same,
We look on as pawns of their game.
They move to testify the day,
Inside out, outside in, inside out, outside in,
All of the way.


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire


STARSHIP TROOPER

Sister Bluebird flying high above,
Shine your wings forward to the sun.
Hide the myst’ries of life on your way.
Though you’ve seen them, please don’t say a word.
What you don’t know, I have never heard.
Starship Trooper, go sailing on by,
Catch my soul, catch the very night.
Hide the moment from my eager eyes.
Though you’ve seen them, please don’t tell a soul.
What you can’t see, can’t be very whole.
Speak to me of summer, long winters longer than time can remember,
Setting up of other roads, travel on in old accustomed ways.
I still remember the talks by the water, the proud sons and daughters that,
In the knowledge of the land, spoke to me in sweet accustomed ways.
Mother life, hold firmly on to me.
Catch my knowledge higher than the day.
Lose as much as only you can show.
Though you’ve seen them, please don’t say a word.
What I don’t know, I have never shared.
Loneliness is a power that we possess to give or take away forever.
All I know can be shown by your acceptance of the fact there shown before you.
Take what I say in a diff’rent way and it’s easy to see that this is all confusion.
As I see a new day in me, I can also show if you and you may follow.
Speak to me of summer, long winters longer than time can remember,
Setting up of other roads, travel on in old accustomed ways.
I still remember the talks by the water, the proud sons and daughters that,
In the knowledge of the land, spoke to me in sweet accustomed ways


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Steve Howe


I’VE SEEN ALL GOOD PEOPLE

I’ve seen all good people turn their heads each day
so satisfied I’m on my way.
I’ve seen all good people turn their heads each day
so satisfied I’m on my way.
Take a straight and stronger course to the corner of your life.
Make the white queen run so fast she hasn’t got time to make you a wife.
‘Cause it’s time, it’s time in time with your time and its news is captured
For the queen to use.
Move me on to any black square,
Use me any time you want,
Just remember that the goal
Is for us to capture all we want, anywhere,
Yea, yea, yea.
Don’t surround yourself with yourself,
Move on back two squares,
Send an instant karma to me,
Initial it with loving care
Don’t surround
Yourself.
‘Cause it’s time, it’s time in time with your time and its news is captured
For the queen to use.
Diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit didda.
Don’t surround yourself with yourself.
Don’t surround yourself with yourself, Don’t surround yourself.
Move on back two squares,
Send an instant karma to me, Send an instant
Initial it with loving care Karma to me. Don’t surround Yourself.
‘Cause it’s time, it’s time in time with your time and its news is captured
For the queen to use.
Diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit diddit didda.
‘Cause it’s time, it’s time in time with your time and its news is captured.
I’ve seen all good people turn their heads each day so satisfied I’m on my way.


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire


PERFORMED BY

Jon Anderson – lead vocals
Chris Squire – bass guitar, vocals
Trevor Rabin – guitar, vocals
Tony Kaye – keyboards, vocals
Alan White – drums, vocals
Bill Bruford – drums
Rick Wakeman – keyboards
Steve Howe – guitar, vocals


ADDITIONAL MUSICIANS

Jonathan Elias – synthesizer, keyboards, vocals
Tony Levin – bass guitar
Jimmy Haun – guitar
Billy Sherwood – bass, guitars, keyboards, vocals
Allan Schwartzberg – percussion
Gary Barlough – synthesizer
Jerry Bennett – synthesizer, percussion
Jim Crichton – synthesizer, keyboards
Gary Falcone – vocals
Deborah Anderson – vocals Jon’s daughter
Ian Lloyd – vocals
Tommy Funderburk – vocals
Sherman Foote – synthesizer
Brian Foraker – synthesizer
Chris Fosdick – synthesizer
Rory Kaplan – synthesizer
Alex Lasarenko – synthesizer, keyboards
Steve Porcaro – synthesizer
Michael Sherwood – vocals Billy’s brother
Danny Vaughn – vocals

ROUNDABOUT

I’ll be the round about
The words will make you out ‘n’ out
You change the day your way
Call it morning driving through the sound and
In and out the valley
The music dance and sing
They make the children really ring
I spend the day your way
Call it morning driving through the sound and
In and out the valley
In and around the lake
Mountains come out of the sky and they stand there
One mile over we’ll be there and we’ll see you
Ten true summers we’ll be there and laughing too
Twenty four before my love you’ll see
I’ll be there with you
I will remember you
Your silhouette will charge the view
Of distance atmosphere
Call it morning driving through the sound and
Even in the valley
In and around the lake
Mountains come out of the sky and they stand there
One mile over we’ll be there and we’ll see you
Ten true summers we’ll be there and laughing too
Twenty four before my love you’ll see
I’ll be there with you
Along the drifting cloud the eagle searching
Down on the land
Catching the swirling wind the sailor sees
The rim of the land
The eagle’s dancing wings create as weather
Spins out of hand
Go closer hold the land feel partly no more
Than grains of sand
We stand to lose all time a thousand answers
By in our hand
Next to your deeper fears we stand
Surrounded by a million years
I’ll be the roundabout
The words will make you out ‘n’ out
I’ll be the roundabout
The words will make you out ‘n’ out
In and around the lake
Mountains come out of the sky and they stand there
One mile over we’ll be there and we’ll see you
Ten true summers we’ll be there and laughing too
Twenty four before my love you’ll see
I’ll be there with you
I’ll be the roundabout
The words will make you out ‘n’ out
I spend the day your way
Call it morning driving through the sound and
In and out the valley
In and around the lake
Mountains come out of the sky and they stand there
One mile over we’ll be there and we’ll see you
Ten true summers we’ll be there and laughing too
Twenty four before my love you’ll see
I’ll be there with you


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Steve Howe


SOUTH SIDE OF THE SKY

A river a mountain to be crossed
The sunshine in mountains sometimes lost
Around the south side so cold that we cried
Were we ever colder on that day a million
Miles away
It seemed from all eternity
Move forward was my friend’s only cry
In deeper to somewhere we could lie
And rest for the the day with cold in the way
Were we ever colder on that day a million
Miles away
It seemed from all eternity
The moments seemed lost in all the noise
A snow storm a stimulating voice
Of warmth of the sky of warmth when you die
Were we ever warmer on that day a million
Miles away
We seemed from all eternity
The sunshine in mountains sometimes lost
The river can disregard the cost
And melt in the sky warmth when you die
Were we ever warmer on that day a million miles away
We seemed from all of eternity


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire


HEART OF THE SUNRISE

Love comes to you and you follow
Lose one on to the heart of the sunrise
Sharp distance
How can the wind with its arms
All around me
Lost on a wave and then after
Dream on on to the heart of the sunrise
Sharp distance
How can the wind with so many around me
Lost in the city
Lost in their eyes as you hurry by
Counting the broken ties they decide
Love comes to you and then after
Dream on on to the heart of the sunrise
Lost on a wave that you’re dreaming
Dram on on to the heart of the sunrise
Sharp distance
How can the wind with its arms all around
Me
Sharp distance
How can the wind with so many around me
I feel lost in the city
Lost in their eyes as you hurry by
Counting the broken ties they decided
Straight light moving and removing
Sharpness of the colour sun shine
Straight light searching all the meanings
Of the song
Long last treatment of the telling that
Relates to all the words sung
Dreamer easy in the chair that really fits
You
Love comes to you and then after
Dream on on to the heart of the sunrise
Sharp distance
How can the sun with its arms all around
Me
Sharp distance
How can the wind with so many around me
I feel lost in the city


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Bill Bruford


AMERICA

Let us be lovers,
We’ll marry our fortunes together.
I’ve got some real estate
Here in my bag.
So we bought a pack of cigarettes,
And Mrs. Wagner’s pies,
And walked off
To look for America.
Kathy I said,
As we boarded a Greyhound in Pittsburgh,
Michigan seems like a dream to me now,
It took me four days
To hitch-hike from Saginaw.
I’ve come to look for America.
Laughing on the bus,
Playing games with the faces,
She said the man in the gabardine suit
Was a spy.
I said, “Be careful,
His bow tie is really a camera.”
Toss me a cigarette,
I think there’s one in my raincoat.
We smoked the last one
an hour ago.
So I looked at the scenery,
She read her magazine;
And the moon rose over an open field.
Kathy, I’m lost I said,
Thought I knew she was sleeping.
I’m empty and aching and
I don’t know why.
Counting the cars
On the New Jersey Turnpike.
They’ve all come
To look for America,
All come to look for America,
All come to look for America.


WRITTEN BY

Paul Simon


CLOSE TO THE EDGE

A seasoned witch could call you from the depths of your disgrace,
And rearrange your liver to the solid mental grace,
And achieve it all with music that came quickly from afar,
Then taste the fruit of man recorded losing all against the hour.
And assessing points to nowhere, leading ev’ry single one.
A dewdrop can exalt us like the music of the sun,
And take away the plain in which we move,
And choose the course you’re running.
Down at the edge, round by the corner,
Not right away, not right away.
Close to the edge, down by a river,
Not right away, not right away.
Crossed the line around the changes of the summer,
Reaching out to call the color of the sky.
Passed around a moment clothed in mornings faster than we see.
Getting over all the time I had to worry,
Leaving all the changes far from far behind.
We relieve the tension only to find out the master’s name.
Down at the end, round by the corner.
Close to the edge, just by a river.
Seasons will pass you by.
I get up, I get down.
Now that it’s all over and done,
Now that you find, now that you’re whole.
My eyes convinced, eclipsed with the younger moon attained with love.
It changed as almost strained amidst clear manna from above.
I crucified my hate and held the word within my hand.
There’s you, the time, the logic, or the reasons we don’t understand.
Sad courage claimed the victims standing still for all to see,
As armoured movers took approached to overlook the sea.
There since the cord, the license, or the reasons we understood will be.
Down at the edge, close by a river.
Close to the edge, round by the corner.
Close to the end, down by the corner.
Down at the edge, round by the river.
Sudden problems shouldn’t take away the startled memory.
All in all, the journey takes you all the way.
As apart from any reality that you’ve ever seen and known.
Guessing problems only to deceive the mention,
Passing paths that climb halfway into the void.
As we cross from side to side, we hear the total mass retain.
Down at the edge, round by the corner.
Close to the end, down by a river.
Seasons will pass you by.
I get up, I get down.
In her white lace, you could clearly see the lady sadly looking.
Saying that she’d take the blame
For the crucifixion of her own domain.
I get up,
I get down,
I get up,
I get down.
Two million people barely satisfy.
Two hundred women watch one woman cry, too late.
The eyes of honesty can achieve.
How many millions do we deceive each day?
I get up, I get down.
I get up, I get down.
In charge of who is there in charge of me.
Do I look on blindly and say I see the way?
The truth is written all along the page.
How old will I be before I come of age for you?
I get up, I get down.
I get up, I get down.
I get up, I get down.
The time between the notes relates the color to the scenes.
A constant vogue of triumphs dislocate man, it seems.
And space between the focus shape ascend knowledge of love.
As song and chance develop time, lost social temp’rance rules above.
Ah, ah.
Then according to the man who showed his outstretched arm to space,
He turned around and pointed, revealing all the human race.
I shook my head and smiled a whisper, knowing all about the place.
On the hill we viewed the silence of the valley,
Called to witness cycles only of the past.
And we reach all this with movements in between the said remark.
Close to the edge, down by the river.
Down at the end, round by the corner.
Seasons will pass you by,
Now that it’s all over and done,
Called to the seed, right to the sun.
Now that you find, now that you’re whole.
Seasons will pass you by,
I get up, I get down.


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Steve Howe


THE REVEALING SCIENCE OF GOD (DANCE OF THE DAWN)

Dawn of light lying between a silence and sold sources
Chased amid fusions of wonder
In moments hardly seen forgotten
Coloured in pastures of chance dancing leaves cast spells of challenge
Amused but real in thought, we fled from the sea whole
Dawn of thought transferred through moments of days undersearching earth
Revealing corridors of time provoking memories
Disjointed but with purpose
Craving penetrations offer links with the self instructors sharp and tender love
As we took to the air a picture of distance
Dawn of our power we amuse redescending as fast as misused expression
As only to teach love as to reveal passion chasing late into corners
And we danced from the ocean
Dawn of love sent within us colours of awakening among the many wont to follow
Only tunes of a different age
As the links span our endless caresses for the freedom of life everlasting
Talk to the sunlight caller
Soft summer mover distance mine
Called out a tune but I never saw the face
Heard but not replaced
I ventured to talk but I never lost my place
Cast out a spell rendered for the light of day
Lost in lights array
I ventured to see as the sound began to play
What happened to this song we once knew so well
Signed promise for moments caught within the spell
I must have waited all my life for this
Moment moment
The future poised with the splendour just begun
The light we were as one
And crowded through the curtains of liquid into sun
And for a moment when our world had filled the skies
Magic turned our eyes
To feast on the treasure set for our strange device
What happened to wonders we once knew so well
Did we forget what happened, surely we can tell
We must have waited all our lives for this
Moment moment moment
Starlight movement
Reasons
Release forward
Tallest rainbow
Sun shower seasons
Life flower reasons
They move fast, they tell me
But I just can’t believe that I can feel it
There’s someone to tell you
Amid the challenge we look around in unison with you
Getting over overhanging trees, let them rape the forest
Thoughts would send our fusion clearly to be home
Getting over wars we do not mean, or so it seems so clearly
Sheltered with our passion clearly to be home
They move fast, they tell me
But I just can’t believe they really mean to
There’s someone to tell you
And I just can’t believe our song will leave you
Skyline teacher
Warland seeker
Send out poison
Cast iron leader
And through the rhythm of moving slowly
Sent through the rhythm work out the story
Move over glory to sons of old fighters past
Young Christians see it from the beginning
Old people feel it, that’s what they’re saying
Move over glory to sons of old fighters past
They move fast, they tell me
But I just can’t believe they really mean to
There’s someone to tell you
A course towards a universal season
Getting over overhanging trees, let them rape the forest
They might stand and leave them clearly to be home
Getting over wars they do not mean, we charm the movement suffers
Call out all our memories clearly to be home
We’ve moved fast, we need love
A part we offer is our only freedom
What happened to this song we once knew so well
Signed promise for moments caught within the spell
We must have waited all our lives for this
Moment moment
Past present movers moments we’ll process the future,
But only through Him we know
Send flowered rainbows
A piece apart chased flowers of the dark and lights of songs
To follow and show all we feel for and know of
Cast round
You seekers of the truth accepting that reason will relive
And breathe and hope and chase and love
For you and you and you


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Steve Howe/Rick Wakeman/Alan White


PERFORMED BY

Jon Anderson – lead vocals
Chris Squire – bass guitar, vocals
Trevor Rabin – guitar, vocals
Tony Kaye – keyboards, vocals
Alan White – drums, vocals
Bill Bruford – drums
Rick Wakeman – keyboards
Steve Howe – guitar, vocals


ADDITIONAL MUSICIANS

Jonathan Elias – synthesizer, keyboards, vocals
Tony Levin – bass guitar
Jimmy Haun – guitar
Billy Sherwood – bass, guitars, keyboards, vocals
Allan Schwartzberg – percussion
Gary Barlough – synthesizer
Jerry Bennett – synthesizer, percussion
Jim Crichton – synthesizer, keyboards
Gary Falcone – vocals
Deborah Anderson – vocals Jon’s daughter
Ian Lloyd – vocals
Tommy Funderburk – vocals
Sherman Foote – synthesizer
Brian Foraker – synthesizer
Chris Fosdick – synthesizer
Rory Kaplan – synthesizer
Alex Lasarenko – synthesizer, keyboards
Steve Porcaro – synthesizer
Michael Sherwood – vocals Billy’s brother
Danny Vaughn – vocals

SIBERIAN KHATRU

Sing, bird of prey
Beauty begins at the foot of you, do you believe the manner?
Gold stainless nail
Torn through the distance of man as they regard the summit
Even Siberia goes through the motions, hold out and hold up
Hold down the window (outbound, river)
Hold out the morning that comes into view (bluetail, tailfly)
River running right on over my head
How does she sing?
Who holds the ring and ring and you will find me coming?
Cold reigning king
Hold all the secrets from you as they produce the movement
Even Siberia goes through the motions, hold out and hold up
Hold down the window (outbound, river)
Hold out the morning that comes into view (bluetail, tailfly)
River running right over the outboard, river
Bluetail, tailfly
Luther in time
Dood’ndoodit, dah, d’t-d’t-dah
Hold down the window
Hold out the morning that comes into view
Warm side, the tower
Green leaves reveal the heart spoken Khatru
Gold stainless nail
Torn through the distance of man as they regard the summit
Cold reigning king
Shelter the women that sing as they produce the movement
River running right on over
Then over my head outboard, river
Bluetail, tailfly
Luther in time
Suntower asking
Cover, lover
June cast, moon fast
As one changes
Heart gold, leaver
Soul mark, mover
Christian, changer
Called out, saviour
Moon gate, climber
Turn round, glider


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Steve Howe/Rick Wakeman


LONG DISTANCE RUNAROUND

Long distance run around
long time waiting to feel the sound
I still remember the dream there
I still remember the time you said goodbye
did we really tell lies
letting in the sunshine
did we really count to one hundred
Cold summer listening
hot colour melting the anger to stone
I still remember the time you said goodbye
did we really tell lies
did we really count to one hundred


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson


GATES OF DELERIUM

Stand and fight we do consider
Reminded of an inner pact between us
That’s seen as we go
And ride there
In motion
To fields in debts of honor
Defending
Stand the marchers soaring talons,
Peaceful lives will not deliver freedom,
Fighting we know,
Destroy oppression
The point to reaction
As leaders look to you
Attacking
Choose and renounce throwing chains to the floor.
Kill or be killing faster sins correct the flow.
Casting giant shadows off vast penetrating force
To alter via the war that seen
As friction spans the spirits wrath ascending to redeem.
Wars that shout in screams of anguish,
Power spent passion bespoils our soul receiver,
Surely we know.
In glory
We rise to offer,
Create our freedom,
A word we utter,
A word.
Words cause our banner, victorious our day.
Will silence be promised as violence display?
The curse increased we fight the pow’r
And live by it by day.
Our gods awake in thunderous roars,
And guide the leaders hand in paths of glory to the cause.
Listen, should we fight forever
Knowing as we do know fear destroys?
Listen, should we leave our children?
Listen, our lives stare in silence;
Help us now.
Listen, your friends have been broken,
They tell us of your poison; now we know.
Kill them, give them as they give us.
Slay them, burn their children’s laughter
On to hell.
The fist will run, grasp metal to gun.
The spirit sings in crashing tones,
We gain the battle drum.
Our cries will shrill, the air will moan and crash into the dawn.
The pen won’t stay the demon’s wings,
The hour approaches pounding out the Devil’s sermon.
Soon, oh soon the light,
Pass within and soothe this endless night
And wait here for you,
Our reason to be here.
Soon, oh soon the time,
All we move to gain will reach and calm;
Our heart is open,
Our reason to be here.
Long ago, set into rhyme.
Soon, oh soon the light,
Ours to shape for all time,
Ours the right;
The sun will lead us,
Our reason to be here.
Soon, oh soon the light,
Ours to shape for all time,
Ours the right;
The sun will lead us,
Our reason to be here.


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Steve Howe/Alan White/Patrick Moraz


TO BE OVER

We go sailing down the calming streams,
Drifting endlessly by the bridge.
To be over, we will see, to be over.
Do not suffer through the game of chance that plays;
Always doors to lock away your dreams.
Think it over, time will heal your fear, think it over.
Balance the thoughts that release within you.
Childlike soul dreamer.
One journey, one to seek and see in ev’ry light
Do open true pathways away.
Carrying closer,
Go gently, holding doors will open ev’ry way
You wander true pathways away.
After all your soul will still surrender.
After all don’t doubt your part,
Be ready to be loved.


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Steve Howe/Alan White/Patrick Moraz


GOING FOR THE ONE

Get the idea
Cross around the track
When you leap on the flank
Of a thoroughbred racing chaser
Get the feel
As the rhythm flows
Would you like to go
And shoot the mountain masses?
And here you stand no taller than the grass seas
And should you really chase so hard
The truth of sport plays rings around you
Going for the one
Going for the one
Get in the way
As the tons of water
Racing with you
Crash into the rudders
Once at the start
Can you gamble that
You really surely
Really mean to finish
After seeing all your sense of fear diminish
As you treat danger as a pure connection
As you throw away all misconceptions
Going for the one
Going for the one
Going for-ward to
Listen in time
Taken so high
To touch, to move
Listen to life
Touching, touch time
Travel, twilight
Taken so high
Roundabout, sounding out
Love me so
Now the verses I’ve sang
Don’t add much weight
To the story in my head
So I’m thinking I should go and write a punchline
But they’re so hard to find
In my cosmic mind
So I think I’ll take
A look out of the window
When I think about you
I don’t feel low
Should I really chase so hard?
The truth of sport plays rings around you
Going for the one
Going for the one
Going for-ward to
Listen in time
Taken so high
To touch, to move
Listen to life
Touching, touch time
Travel, twilight
Taken so high
Taking your time
Turn on to love
Turnstile to one
Tender timing
Rocking, rolling
Listen in time
Taken so high
To touch, to move
Listen to life
Touching, touch time
Travel, twilight
Taken so high
Taking your time
Turn on to love
Turnstile to one
Tender timing
Rocking, rolling
Turn on to love
Turnstile to one
Tender timing
Rocking, rolling
Moments decide…
Moments delight…
Moments invite…
Talk about sending love…


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson


TURN OF THE CENTURY

Realising a form out of stone,
Set hands moving.
Roan shaped his heart,
Through his working hands.
Worked to mold his passion into clay,
Like the sun.
In his room, his lady,
She would dance and sing so completely.
“So be still,” he now cries,
“I have time, oh let clay transform thee so.”
In the deep cold of night,
Winter calls, he cries “Don’t deny me!”
For his lady, deep her illness.
Time has caught her,
And will for all reasons take her.
In the still light of dawn, she dies.
Helpless hands soul revealing.
Like leaves we touch, we learn.
We once knew the story.
As winter calls he will starve,
All but to see the stone be life.
Now Roan, no more tears.
Set to work his strength,
So transformed him.
Realizing a form out of stone,
His work so absorbed him.
Could she hear him?
Could she see him?
All aglow was his room,
Dazed in this light.
He would touch her,
He would hold her.
Laughing as they danced,
Highest colors touching others.
Did her eyes at the turn of the century,
Tell me plainly.
How we’ll meet, how we’ll love,
Oh, let life so transform me.
Like leaves we touch, we dance.
We once knew the story.
As autumn called and we both,
Remembered all those many years ago.
I’m sure we know.
Was the sign in the day with a touch,
As I kiss your fingers.
We walk hands in the sun,
Memories when we’re young,
Love lingers so.
Was it sun through the haze,
That made all your looks,
As warm as moonlight?
As a pearl deep your eyes,
Tears have flown away,
All the same light.
Did her eyes at the turn of the century,
Tell me plainly.
When we meet, how we’ll look,
As we smile time will leave me clearly.
Like leaves we touch, we see,
We will know the story.
As autumn calls we’ll both remember,
All those many years ago.


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Steve Howe/Alan White


WONDEROUS STORIES

I awoke this morning
love laid me down by a river.
Drifting I turned on upstream
Bound for my forgiver.
In the giving of my eyes to see your face.
Sound did silence me
leaving no trace.
I beg to leave, to hear your wonderous stories.
Beg to hear your wonderous stories.
He spoke of lands not far
or lands they were in his mind.
Of fusion captured high
where reason captured his time.
In no time at all he took me to the gate.
In haste I quickly checked the time.
if I was late I had to leave to hear your wonderous stories.
Had to hear your wonderous stories.
Hearing
Hearing
Hearing your wonderous stories.
Hearing your wonderous stories.
It is no lie I can see deeply into the future.
Imagine everything
You’re close
and were you there to stand
so cautiously at first and then so high.
As he spoke my spirit climbed into the sky.
I bid it to return
to hear your wonderous stories.
Return to hear your wonderous stories.
Hearing,
Hearing,
Hearing,
Hearing,
Hearing,


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson


DON’T KILL THE WHALE

You’re first
I’m last
You’re thirst
I’m asked to justify
Killing our last heaven beast
Don’t hunt the whale
In beauty
Vision
Do we
Offer much
If we reason with destiny, gonna lose our touch
Don’t kill the whale
Rejoice
They sing
They worship their own space
In a moment of love, they will die for their grace
Don’t kill the whale
If time will allow
We will judge all who came
In the wake of our new age to stand for the frail
Don’t kill the whale


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire


RELEASE, RELEASE

Have you heard before, hit it out, don’t look back
Rock is the medium of our generation
Stand for every right, kick it out, hear you shout
For the right of all of creation
We’ve heard before, but we just don’t seem to move
The pressure’s on is there lack of concentration
Power defy our needs, lift us up, show us now
Show us how amid the rack of confusion
Drive in thoughts of high, satisfy, in a plan
Set it out for all to understand it
We’ve heard before, but we just don’t seem to move
The pressure’s on is there lack of concentration
Lost and wondering, maybe, how it is
Seems to me, it’s as simple as this
No matter, where you go, you’re going to find
You won’t see me in front, but you can’t leave me behind
Power at first to the needs of each others days
Simple to lose in the void sounds of anarchy’s calling ways
All unaccounted for in the craziness of power
In the craziness
Release all, release all, or abandon your hope for your brother
Release all, release all, or abandon your hope for your sister
Release, release, enough controllers
Show some signs of appreciated loyalties
Release, release, enough controllers
Show some signs of appreciated loyalties

Straight jacket, freedom’s march, is it all, far beyond
Our reason of understanding
Campaign everything, anti-right, anti-left
Anticipate the love of creation
Stand for every right
Kick it out, hear you shout
Further the right
Further the right
Further the light
Of all of creation
Power at first to the needs of each other’s days
Simple to lose in the void of anarchy’s calling ways
All unaccounted for in the craziness of power
In the craziness
Release all, release all, or abandon your hope for your brother
Release all, release all, or abandon your hope for your sister
Release, release
Release, release
Release, release
Release, release


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Alan White/Chris Squire


ARRIVING UFO

I could not take it, oh, so seriously, really
When you called and said you’d seen a UFO
But then it dawned on me the message in writing
Spelt out a meeting never dreamed of before
I looked out in the night
Strange and startling
Was this voice of time just saying
There’s got to be a linking of everyone
Got to be a center
It all comes flooding back
Arriving through eons of times
Immortal power of the future to behold
Vessels of a different impression
None that we could ever hope to have known
So look out in the night
Once they arrive
On that perennial light
Impress a bolder empire of energy
In the ships we see
The coming of outer space
You say there’s no reason to conjure
With the force as it has been known to be seen
You say I’m a fool, a believer
Put your feet on the earth, it is green
But look out in the night
Wait for they arrive
To start such sciences anew
Here it is the coming of outer space
Such a pure delight
The coming of outer space
Look out, look out
Look out, look out
Look out, look out
Look out


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Steve Howe/Rick Wakeman


RICHARD

Richard set to sail the seven seas
With the power held within him he could feel the need
To reach out far and touch on all who came
To the resting place named Overon where he hath been
There you are
Take care my love
I’ll be thinking all about you
With the morning stars
There you are
Take care my love
I’ll be thinking all about you
With the morning stars
Richard fought the seven wars of old
As around him his foot soldiers cheered with hearts of gold
He rode amongst them shouting for the king
Didn’t stop to think of ages past where he hath been
There you are
Take care my love
I’ll be thinking of the time we shared
Amid the morning stars
There you are
Take care my love
I’ll be thinking of the time we shared
Amid the morning stars
Richard never scaled to higher dreams
If a leader has it in for you, can you succeed
And though his passion kept us all afloat
There’s no room for a deciever in the union boat
There you are
Take care my love
I’ll singing songs about you
Til the morning, til the morning comes along
Richard dreamt of seeing but believed
In the gathering light a paradise he once concieved
To carry forth along the seven seas
With the light to a tree of Overon he set us free


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Steve Howe/Rick Wakeman/Alan White


PERFORMED BY

Jon Anderson – lead vocals
Chris Squire – bass guitar, vocals
Trevor Rabin – guitar, vocals
Tony Kaye – keyboards, vocals
Alan White – drums, vocals
Bill Bruford – drums
Rick Wakeman – keyboards
Steve Howe – guitar, vocals


ADDITIONAL MUSICIANS

Jonathan Elias – synthesizer, keyboards, vocals
Tony Levin – bass guitar
Jimmy Haun – guitar
Billy Sherwood – bass, guitars, keyboards, vocals
Allan Schwartzberg – percussion
Gary Barlough – synthesizer
Jerry Bennett – synthesizer, percussion
Jim Crichton – synthesizer, keyboards
Gary Falcone – vocals
Deborah Anderson – vocals Jon’s daughter
Ian Lloyd – vocals
Tommy Funderburk – vocals
Sherman Foote – synthesizer
Brian Foraker – synthesizer
Chris Fosdick – synthesizer
Rory Kaplan – synthesizer
Alex Lasarenko – synthesizer, keyboards
Steve Porcaro – synthesizer
Michael Sherwood – vocals Billy’s brother
Danny Vaughn – vocals

TANGO

I just want to tell you everything
A quality of days of days of old
But the story has a sense of
Timelessness and glory
‘Twas in the golden days of
That which Lord Icoloram [??]
A lord of might, a king of justice
All in all, a gentle master
More
A vision he had whilst fighting in a war
There appeared three angels of the sword
“Bring out the living if you have
Bring out the hungry, let them feed
Bring out the blind and let them see
Bring out the soldiers of the free”
The lord of mighty Equitor
Began decision change of
Change within his court
Announced formation of the dead
From all the wars they had been led
To rise and march
To rise and march
The lord of mighty Equitor Icoloram
Built forth an army in the spirit of men
The lord of mighty Equitor Icoloram
Built for the justice of millions that have died
In the wars gone by
Ten million arose
And came from all the battlefields
In ten thousand wars that had been fought
Bringing forth a multitude of hosts
Astride a sharp white horse
A ghost, the Reaper, shine in viscious fright
Oh Reaper, king of night
Better they rode and charged down the graves
At the flight of the insane
As one, over land they plundered
This ghastly army has ever proclaimed
Ghost of Intrencha in portion
Of human waste and had you the gleam
The day was to come
The day was to come
It was to come reckoning
The day of judgement was at hand
As it will be, so it will be
The lord of mighty Equitor Icoloram
Built forth the army in the spirit of men
This day the fate of man
Let no man put asunder
All things will pass
And peace will win forever
The lord of mighty Equitor Icoloram
Built forth an army in the spirit of men
Days gone by, days gone by
So that day, the ancient of times
Appeared and spread, answers divide
Lo! it passed, as all in one accord now
Throw off the chains,
Torn with the lord
No more wars
My tears
Were
Tears
Of
Joy


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Steve Howe/Rick Wakeman/Alan White


NEVER DONE BEFORE

All good will feel the right of way,
and music be this act to play,
believers think soon man will turn the key.
In the old their summer fails to show,
in the young their passion seems to grow,
if your love is right the rest is harmony.
You can hold love in your hand,
you can hold love in you heart,
you can hold love like you’ve never done before;
You can hold on to your dreams,
shine your love the way it seems,
we are always one as we are one,
as we are harmony.


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Steve Howe/Rick Wakeman/Alan White


CROSSFIRE

Julie’s sick and tired of her job n’all the reasons lately
She took it out on God and laid her soul to hell and let the baby die
Julie’s child was born without a need or a reason for being
She took it as a message from a real and a distant life
Shirley gets to help her with the child though
she’s strung out on crack time
Shirley never knew what it was to be held in real love
Together getting high to get to mess up their night
Anything to get up so they’re losing their mind
Just to get high, breaking out from this life, gotta get them a drug to get
higher
Julie gets to walking out and drags the child, says “come on”
How we’ll walk in the dark of the morning
Cars screaming round the corner, drugged to heaven,
guns are loaded,
locked in vengeance
Who shoots the child?
Watching in the ghetto is the spine and the cruel of the gang life
Sign language of the get go you get in the gang life
Fear the only law, fear is all we hear about,
Feed us in the raw, fear is all we fear about
Listen, get up, quickly get up, get up
It’s the answer to punishment given you
Don’t give us reasons,
Caught in the crossfire dying
God give us reasons,
Don’t give a reason, God give a reason
Why lay dead a child’s life?


WRITTEN BY

Steve Howe/Chris Squire


MACHINE MESSIAH

Run down a street
Where the glass shows
That summer has gone
Age, in the doorways
Resenting the pace of the dawn.
All of them standing in line
All of them waiting for time.
From time, the great healer,
The machine-Messiah
Is born.
Cables that carry the life
To the cities we build
Threads that link diamonds of life
To the satanic mills
Ah, to see in every way
That we feel it every
Day, and know that
Maybe we’ll change
Offered the chance
To finally unlearn our lessons
And alter our stance.
Friends make their way into systems of chance
[friends make their way of escape into systems of chance]
Escape to freedom I need to be there
Waiting and watching, the tables are turning
I’m waiting and watching
I need to be there.
I care to see them walk away
And, to be there when they say
They will return.
Machine, Messiah
The mindless
Search for a higher
Controller
Take me to the fire
And hold me
Show me the strength of your
Singular eye.
History dictating symptoms of ruling romance
Claws at the shores of the water upon which we dance
All of us standing in line
All of us waiting for time
To feel it, all the way
And to be there when they
Say they know that
Maybe we’ll change
Offered the chance
To finally unlearn our lessons
And alter our stance.
Machine, machine Messiah.
Take me into the fire
Hold me, machine Messiah
And show me
The strength of your singular eye.


WRITTEN BY

Geoff Downes/Trevor Horn/Steve Howe/Chris Squire/Alan White


TEMPUS FUGIT

Born in the night
She would run like a leopard
That freaks at the sight
Of a mind close beside herself
And the nearer I came
How the country would change
She was using the landscape
To hide herself.
More in the mind
Than the body this feeling
A sense at the end
Of a circular line
That is drawn at an angle
I see when I’m with you
To navigate waters and finally answer to-yes.
If you were there you would want to be near me
Innocence, you could hold all the materials
And though nothing would really be living
It would shock Your fall into landing light
In the north sky time flies fast to the morning
The cold of the dawn it meant nothing to us
You were keeping your best situation
An answer to-yes
(Yes, Yes) And the moment I see you
(Yes, Yes) It’s so good to be near you
(Yes, Yes) And the feeling you give me
(Yes, Yes) Makes me want to be with you
(Yes, Yes) From the moment you tell me – yes
If you could see all the roads I have travelled
Towards some unusable last equilibrium
Run like an athlete and die like a dead beaten speed-freak
An answer to all of your answers to-yes
In the north sky time flies faster than morning
The cold of the dawn it meant nothing to us
You were keeping your best situation
An answer to Yes
(Yes, Yes) And the moment I see you
(Yes, Yes) It’s so good to be near you
(Yes, Yes) And the feeling you give me
(Yes, Yes) Makes me want to be with you
(Yes, Yes) If we wait for an answer
(Yes, Yes) Will the silence be broken
(Yes, Yes) Should we wait for an answer
(Yes, Yes) Do we leave it unspoken


WRITTEN BY

Geoff Downes/Trevor Horn/Steve Howe/Chris Squire/Alan White


OWNER OF A LONELY HEART

Move yourself
You always live your life
Never thinking of the future
Prove yourself
You are the move you make
Take your chances win or loser
See yourself
You are the steps you take
You and you – and that’s the only way
Shake – shake yourself
You’re every move you make
So the story goes
Owner of a lonely heart
Owner of a lonely heart
Much better than – a
Owner of a broken heart
Owner of a lonely heart
tumby
Say – you don’t want to chance it
You’ve been hurt so before
Watch it now
The eagle in the sky
How he dancin’ one and only
You – lose yourself
No not for pity’s sake
There’s no real reason to be lonely
Be yourself
Give your free will a chance
You’ve got to want to succeed
tumby
Owner of a lonely heart
Owner of a lonely heart
Much better than – a
Owner of a broken heart
Owner of a lonely heart
Owner of a lonely heart
After my own decision
They confused me so
My love said never question your will at all
In the end you’ve got to go
Look before you leap
And don’t you hesitate at all – no no
Owner of a lonely heart
tumby
Owner of a lonely heart
Owner of a lonely heart
Owner of a lonely heart
Much better than – a
Owner of a broken heart
Owner of a lonely heart
Owner of a lonely heart
tumby
Sooner or later each conclusion
Will decide the lonely heart
It will excite it will delight
It will give a better start
Owner of a lonely heart

Owner of a lonely heart
Don’t deceive your free will at all
Don’t deceive your free will at all
Don’t deceive your free will at all
Just receive it
Owner of a lonely heart


WRITTEN BY

Trevor Rabin/Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Trevor Horn


IT CAN HAPPEN

You can fool yourself
You can cheat until you’re blind
You can cut your heart
It can happen
You can mend the wires
You can feed the soul apart
You reach
It can happen to you
It can happen to me
It can happen to everyone eventually
It’s a constant fight
A constant fight
You’re pushing the needle to the red
Black and white
Who knows who’s right
No substitute you’re born you’re dead
Fly by night
Created out of fantasy
Our destinations call
Look up – Look down
Look out – Look around
Look up – Look down
There’s a crazy world outside
We’re not about to lose our pride
It can happen to you
It can happen to me
It can happen to everyone eventually
As you happen to say
It can happen today
As it happens
It happens in every way
This world I like
We architects of life
A song a sigh
Developing words that linger
Through fields of green through open eyes
This for us to see
Look up – Look down
Look out – Look around
So look up – Look down
There’s a crazy world outside
We’re not about to lose our pride
It can happen to you
It can happen to me
It can happen to everyone eventually
As you happen to say
It can happen today
As it happens
It happens in every way
As you happen to see
It will happen to be
Nothing happens to nowhere and nowhere
[Solo]
Look up – Look down
There’s a crazy world outside
We’re not about to lose our pride
It can happen to you
It can happen to me
It can happen to everyone eventually
As you happen to see
It will happen to be
Nothing happens to nowhere and nowhere
You can fool yourself
You can cheat until you’re blind
You can cut your heart
You can fool yourself
You can cheat until you’re blind
It can happen to you
It can happen to me
You can cut your heart
It can happen to everyone eventually
As you happen to say
It can happen today
As it happens
It happens in every way
You can mend the wires
You can feed the soul apart
You can touch your life
You can bring your soul alive
It can happen to you
It can happen to me
It can happen to everyone eventually
As you happen to say
It can happen today
As it happens
It happens in every way


WRITTEN BY

Chris Squire/Jon Anderson/Trevor Rabin


LEAVE IT

I can feel no sense of measure
No illusions as we take
Refuge in young man’s pleasure
Breaking down the dreams we make
Real
One down one to go
Another town and one more show
Downtown they’re giving away
But she never came back
No phone can take your place
You know what I mean
We have the same intrigue
As a court of kings
Ah leave it
Ah leave it
Two down there you go
McArthur Park in the driving snow
Uptown they’re digging it out
Better lay your claim
Get home you’re not alone
You just broke out of the danger zone
Be there to show your face
On another dreamy day
Ah leave it
Ah leave it
Goodbye goodbye goodbye bad
Hello hello heaven
Goodbye goodbye goodbye bad
Hello hello heaven
Ah leave it
Ah leave it
I can feel no sense of measure
No illusions as we take
Refuge in young man’s pleasure
Breaking down the dreams we make
Real
Ah leave it
Ah leave it
Goodbye goodbye goodbye bad
Hello hello heaven
Goodbye goodbye goodbye bad
Hello hello heaven
One down one to go
Another town and one more show
One down one to go
Another town and one more show
Ah leave it
Ah leave it
Ah leave it
Goodbye goodbye goodbye bad
Hello hello heaven
Goodbye goodbye goodbye bad
Leave it


WRITTEN BY

Chris Squire/Trevor Rabin/Trevor Horn


HOLD ON

Justice to the left of you
Justice to the right
Speak when you are spoken to
Don’t pretend you’re right
This life’s not for living
It’s for fighting and for war
No matter what the truth is
Hold on to what is yours
Jigsaw puzzle traitors
Set to spill the beans
Constitution screw up
Shattering the dreams
Blood flows in the desert
Dark citadels burning too
Watch! Look over your shoulder
This one is strictly for you
Hold on – Hold on
Wait maybe the answer’s
Looking for you
Hold on – Hold on
Wait! Take you time
Think it through
Yes! I can make it through
Hold on – Hold on
Sunshine shine on through
Hold on – Hold on
Sunshine shine on you
See it through
Talk the simple smile
Such platonic eye
How they drown in incomplete capacity
Strangest of them all
When the feeling calls
How we drown in stylistic audacity
Charge the common ground
Round and round and round
We living in gravity
Shake – We shake so hard
How we laugh so loud
When we reach
We believe in eternity
I believe in eternity
Hold on – Hold on
Wait – Take your time
See it through
Hold on – Hold on
Wait – Maybe a chance
Is looking for you
Sunshine shine on through
Sunshine shine on through
Sunshine shine on you
Hold on – Hold on
Hold on – Hold on
Sunshine – Shine on – Shine on you
Sunshine – Shine on through
Sunshine – Shine on – Shine on through
Sunshine – Shine on you
Sunshine – Shine on – Shine on you
Sunshine – Shine on through
Sunshine – Shine on – Shine on through
Sunshine – Shine on you
Hold on – Hold on
Wait – Take your time
See it through
Hold on – Hold on
Wait – Maybe the answer’s looking for you


WRITTEN BY

Trevor Rabin/Jon Anderson/Chris Squire


RHYTHM OF LOVE

Innocence no answer
To your breaking heart
If the situation
Sometimes falls apart
Then in this ecstasy
Your charms are frozen
No emotion falling through your arms
Morning, daydream, time still growing shorter
Take me over lead me to the water
To the rhythm of love
The rhythm of love
The rhythm of love
Why should I escort you
To your secret needs
Climbing up your ladder
I keep falling down
Anyway will do
Anyone will do
When you dance to your darkest tune
Surrounded
As you crawl around the room
Night time fever burning till you’re higher
Take me over lead me through the fire
The rhythm of love
To the rhythm of love
The rhythm of love
To the rhythm of love
Morning daydream midnight fever
Morning daydream midnight fever
Inhibitions keep you from your point of view
Information needing to confuse
In this situation I have found you
In the rhythm of
Morning daydream midnight fever
Morning daydream midnight fever
Rhythm of love
Rhythm of love
To the rhythm of love
Rhythm of love


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Tony Kaye/Trevor Rabin/Chris Squire


LOVE WILL FIND A WAY

You wanna get close to me
The feeling so clear
But I need some time to see
Vision through my tear
You wanna get next to me
I need your intrusion
I don’t need to be
Blinded by confusion
Here is my heart
Waiting for you
Here is my soul
I eat at chez nous
Love will find a way
If you want it to
Love will find a way
Love will find a way for me and you
Love will find a way
Love will find a way
Love will find a way
Love will find a way
So you want to get over me
And that’s how you feel
Everything you want to be
Seems so unreal
I want to be all of you
And that’s the confusion
It’s so hard for me
To draw a conclusion
Here is my heart
Waiting for you
Here is my soul
I eat at chez nous
Love will find a way
If you want it to
Love will find a way
Love will find a way
Love will find a way
If you want it to
Love will find a way
Love will find a way
Love will find a way
I believe that there’s a way
If you want it to
Will love find a way
Love will find a way
Will love find a way
Love will find a way


WRITTEN BY

Trevor Rabin


HOLY LAMB (SONG FOR HARMONIC CONVERGENCE)

Holy lamb
See the world we started
Is it so low again
Like a light that’s lost upon the stage
So the more it shines, it goes away
Surely then
See the curtain rising to show us once again
All the magic of the earth and the skies
See the more we find
The more we realize
That every time
See the laws of nature keep telling us like a friend
It’s the spirit of emotion dancing to the wind
High above
High above
So sure inspired again
I can tell a new story now
Can we see through this mask of uncertainty
Surely now
How can it be so hard when all there is to know
Don’t be afraid of letting go
It takes a loving heart
To see and show
This love
For our own ecology
Hold the light
Hold the light
Out of love we’ll come a long long glorious way
At the start of every day
A child begins to play
And all we need to know
Is that the future is a friend of yours and mine


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson


BROTHER OF MINE

So giving all the love you have
Never be afraid to show your heart
So giving all the love you have
There is a special reason
A special reason…
In the big dream
We are heroes
We are dreamers
Of the big dream
Someone told me
There are brothers
Live forever
In the big sky
Just hear your voice
Sing all the songs of the earth
Nothing can come between us
You’re a brother of mine
Sing out your sisters
All the dreams of the world
Nothing can come between us
We are the travellers of time
See the desert
We have walked the path
Of all the known religions
In the big dream
We are brothers, we are sisters
Of the big dream
Just hear your voice
Sing all the songs of the earth
Nothing can come between us
You’re a brother of mine
Sing out your sisters
All the dreams of the world
Nothing can come between us
Took me by surprise
It opened up my eyes
I can’t believe we’re ready to
Run another
Run another
Run another
Fourth Dimension Dream
All the way it seems
I can’t believe we’re running to
See the world for what it really is
In the full moon
Took me by surprise
It opened up my eyes
I can’t believe we’re ready to
Run another
Run another
Run another
Fourth Dimension Dream
Always the way it seems
Just hear the voice
In all the songs of the earth
Nothing can come between us
You’re a brother of mine
We hold our hands together
Be the sunshine
Nothing can come between us
You’re a sister of time
Just hear the voice
Sing all the songs of the earth
Nothing can come between us
Nothing can come between us
Nothing can come between us
So give it all the love you have
Never be afraid to show your heart
So giving all the love you have
There is a special reason to come true
So giving all the love you have
Never be afraid to show your heart
So giving all the love you have
There is a special reason
There is a special reason this time
Long lost brother of mine
Seeing my life for the first time
Long lost brother of mine
Living my life in the dig dream
Long lost brother of mine
Walking away from illusion
Long lost brother of mine
Seeing my life for the first time
Long lost brother of mine
Seeing me fly like an eagle
Long lost brother of mine
Watching me walk in the full moon
Long lost brother of mine
Seeing my life for the first time
Long lost brother of mine
Walking this dream everlasting
So it’s there
Putting one into one special reason
So it’s there
Putting one into one
One another. Sure can. Sure can
This is a further dimension
Coming at us for the very first time
It’s the second attention
Realising it all of the time
Re-defining this long lost passion
For the living we’re in
This will be the first of many
I be telling you
Long lost brother of mine
Walking the dream evolution
Long lost brother of mine
Singing the sisters of freedom
Long lost brother of mine
Seeing the fathers of wisdom
Long lost brother of mine
Seeing my life for the first time
So it’s there, but to want it to one special reason
Yes it’s there, but to want it to want one another
So it’s there, but to want it to one special reason
Yes it’s there, you can see what you want to see
Long lost brother of mine


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Rick Wakeman/Steve Howe/Bill Bruford/Geoff Downes


FIST OF FIRE

Carry forth as a guardian to Kingdom Come
With your daggers of the spirit
Let the dagger run
With the Fist of Fire
Be the master now
As the darkness of ages past
Riches silver and gold
In the liquid see
Cast a net can you catch
So you can’t see me
As in death you can climb
Higher thru the sky
Show your wings
Surely you can fly
Fly away past the guardian to Kingdom Come
See the miracle of life
Disappear it’s gone
Go carry your silver ships of light
Go carry your silver ships of light
Go carry your silver ships of life
Go carry your silver ships of life
Go carry your silver ships of life
Keep the fire in your hand
It won’t let you drown
As you fly with your wings
Won’t come falling down
See the flower of youth
Disappear on high
As you gather your true wings
About to fly
To be ready
To be strong
Make it run
This righteous
This wrong
This right
This love
This is how nature controls
The way of all things
this is how the angels sing
Not afraid
No, not afraid
Not afraid of this or that
Not afraid
Carry forth as a guardian to Kingdom Come
With the ghost
And the spirit
Let the fire run
Thru the darkest age
We can surely fly
Thru the darkest age
With the Fist Of Fire
Thru the darkest age
With the Fist of Fire


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Rick Wakeman/Steve Howe/Bill Bruford


I WOULD HAVE WAITED FOREVER

I would have waited forever – For you to return into my life
I would have waited forever – I would have given you everything I had
I would have waited forever – There’s no question, no question at all
So true in the prize, would you wait for me?
All because you got burned, so you took what you needed.
Some will always turn away, say it’s reason enough;
It’s another game of exploration.
Something calls at reverse and it comes to you;
Experience everything as it comes true.
So – It will be then
Change – It will happen
See – That we feel it
All – Is completed.
Don’t you want the world to stop short of giving?
Anytime of night or day, the magic things you love.
Everybody hurts when you shout, when you walk away;
Talk about it according to you.
I would have waited forever – For you to return into my life
I would have waited forever – To give you everything I had
I would have waited forever – There’s no question about it at all
So inbetween the perfect flame of you, this love will never let you down.
Just take it as it comes, for everything will come around.
You put your hand up: stop the flow of where you’re going to;
It’s another game called exploration.
How we imagine everything that we think we’re going through;
It’s another reason to make the break.
Everyone will move with you now to the riverside;
Experience everything, but go with the landslide.
I would have waited forever – For you to return into my life
I would have waited forever – To give you everything I had
I would have waited forever – No question in my body and soul
Forever…


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Jonathan Elias/Steve Howe


PERFORMED BY

Jon Anderson – lead vocals
Chris Squire – bass guitar, vocals
Trevor Rabin – guitar, vocals
Tony Kaye – keyboards, vocals
Alan White – drums, vocals
Bill Bruford – drums
Rick Wakeman – keyboards
Steve Howe – guitar, vocals


ADDITIONAL MUSICIANS

Jonathan Elias – synthesizer, keyboards, vocals
Tony Levin – bass guitar
Jimmy Haun – guitar
Billy Sherwood – bass, guitars, keyboards, vocals
Allan Schwartzberg – percussion
Gary Barlough – synthesizer
Jerry Bennett – synthesizer, percussion
Jim Crichton – synthesizer, keyboards
Gary Falcone – vocals
Deborah Anderson – vocals Jon’s daughter
Ian Lloyd – vocals
Tommy Funderburk – vocals
Sherman Foote – synthesizer
Brian Foraker – synthesizer
Chris Fosdick – synthesizer
Rory Kaplan – synthesizer
Alex Lasarenko – synthesizer, keyboards
Steve Porcaro – synthesizer
Michael Sherwood – vocals Billy’s brother
Danny Vaughn – vocals

LIFT ME UP

Look around – Got no place to stay.
God I hate this town, depending on the day.
You lift me up, you lift me down – Alright, OK.
While I got no life, I got no hope;
I’m falling in love.
Help me through the fight;
Help me with tonight – I’m calling.
What to do I find it hard to know;
Lord, the walk is not the one I chose…
Lift me up and turn me over;
Lead me on into the dawn.
Take me to the highest mountain;
Tie me up, love in a storm.
Have you decided on my fortune?
Facing the future in your eyes,
With your imperial behaviour
We fight amidst the battle cries.
Open doors – They may be closed to me;
The fire’s still burning in my heart…
What to do I find it hard to know;
I want to turn my life around…


WRITTEN BY

Trevor Rabin/Chris Squire


THE CALLING

Feel the calling of a miracle
In the presence of the word.
Now we hold the right to rearrange
How the stories can be heard.
In the beginning is the future,
And the future is at hand;
I’ll be calling voices of Africa
Be the rhythm to the plan.
From the Congo to Lenasia
Be the writing on the wall.
I’ll be calling the colors of India
See the Asian life explode.
Head in to the headlight.
Don’t turn from the rain.
There’s a fire raging somewhere near,
Like a longtime friend who’s
Seen it darker than ebony.
Take off on the turnpike
(Asking for the first call)
Give me more of the same
(Asking for a song)
There’s a fire burning in my heart again.
I’ll be calling the dragons of China;
See the dancers of the Nile.
See the wings of change are on display
This revelation mine.
Feel the calling of a miracle
In the presence of the word.
Head in to the headlight.
Don’t turn from the rain.
There’s a fire raging somewhere near,
Like a longtime friend who’s
Seen it darker than ebony.
Take off on the turnpike
(Asking for the first call)
Give me more of the same
(Asking for a song)
There’s a fire burning in my heart again.
Feel the calling of a miracle,
The revelation mine.


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Trevor Rabin


I AM WAITING

Am I waking to this magic
Am I seeing, all is human,
Human after all…
I wanna be inside your heart
Are you ready
I wanna love forever
Are you thinking
I wanna be inside your heart
What I’m thinking
I wanna know you’re with me.
Highways, starways, many ways
To be open tonight.
High time, look inside your life.
I am waiting.
I am waiting; are you ready?
I am waiting; can you hear me?
Can you hear me?
I happened in the water.
The heaven will fall.
The break in the water.
The secret birth.
Said she loves me; I believe her.
Waited lifetimes, say this to you.
I wanna be inside your heart
Are you ready
I wanna love forever
Are you thinking
I wanna be inside your heart
What I’m thinking
I wanna know you’re with me.
Highways, starways, many ways
To be open tonight.
High time, look inside your life.
I am waiting.
Say you need me, I’m yours.
Say you need me, just because.
(It’s our freedom…)
It’s our freedom, hear me now.
We are made to be here now.
We’ll be waiting for the word
As the healing of the world.
Make me promises, to be true,
All my life my world is you.
I am waiting; are you ready?
Are you ready?
I am waiting; can you hear me?
Can you hear me?


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Trevor Rabin


MIND DRIVE

Don’t forget to seek out the world that you want to stake out
Actions speak much louder than words
And you get to realize
Just as long as you have control, holding the fire
Just as long as you keep control, this point of your desire
Wait as it will all come to you
Feel it as a mutual response
You get the heaven you like
You get the heaven
You get the heaven you need
You get to heaven now
Just as long as you bring the power from the inside
Just as long as you hold the key from the inside
Ascend and create
Ascend and create
Ascension
They will bring you rain
They will move the sky
They will give you light
It will live you long
Thru’ the eyes of child
Through the song of songs
It will bring the moon
It will transfer you
Whole, pushing for the time to call
Dancing on the moon, giving it out
In the night of nights
It will shine for you
With the wings of flight
They will make it thru’
Through the eyes of child and the test of song
It will comfort you
It will make you feel
Whole, looking for the chance to call
Making your world, independently
Whole, watching for the place to run
Dancing, dancing, move
We will make it right
We will dance for you
On this night of nights
They will make it thru’
Through the eyes of child and the wish you are
As the thought that comes from a distant star
Whatever thought you have
Can become a new dream
For the perfect stance
Take you there and back again
And you believe you are
Independently, Whole
Waiting for the signs, Whole
Reaching for the foresight shown
Whole, dancing for the moon, dancing for the light
Whole, pushing for the mind drive, drive
Dancing for the Earth, dancing for the light
Whole
Dancing for the light
They will bring the rain
They will make it right
It will transfer you, each and every night
With their wings of hope, they will cover you
They will make it right, they will shine for you
With their golden wings, close around your soul
It will count for you, it will make you whole
Thru’ the eyes of child, and the song of songs
It will make you move, it will transfer you
And so it comes to this now
When you walk into the bliss that
Holds down the fire
As pleasure will devine
So close so let your heart enter
So come and let your heart enter this
So close and let yourself lose control
Heaven help the love that you send
Heaven has the love you send, free
Whole, watching for the time to call
Dancing in the light, making it right
Dancing, dancing, whole
Waiting for the signs, whole
Reaching for the sight to show
Whole, independently, whole
Pushing for the mind drive, drive
Dancing on the Earth, dancing in the light
They will bring the rain, they will shine the light
Understanding this, it can come tonight
For the love of love and the answers to
It begins with me, it begins with you
Whole, pushing for the time to call
Looking for the sign, making it right
Dancing, dancing, whole
Waiting for the time to call
Dancing in the harmless sun
Entering the mind drive
Don’t forget to seek out the world that you want to stake out
Actions speak much louder than words
And you get to realise
Just as long as you have control, holding the fire
Just as long as you get to keep, this point of your desire
Wait as it will come to you
Feel it as a mutual response
You get the heaven you like
You get to heaven
You get the heaven you need
You get to heaven now


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Alan White/Steve Howe/Rick Wakeman


OPEN YOUR EYES

You’ve got a great imagination
You carry on in the same old way
No lessons learned from yesterday
Talk of changes lost in pages of paperwork
I believe it…
How can we refuse to see
I’ve received it…
What could be our final destiny
I believe that…
Still we go on from day to day
Knowing what could be true
Wish I knew
Wish I knew
Wish I knew
Open your eyes and discover
You’re not the only one
In disguise
Do you wonder
When the change is gonna come?
Open your eyes
You’ve got a great imagination
We cast the world, we set the stage
For what could be the darkest age
Short exchanges
From perfect strangers
We’ll never know
But wish we knew
I believe it…
It’s time to face reality
I’ve received it…
Questioning the powers that be
I believe it…
Are we too confused to see?
Wish I knew
Wish I knew
Wish I knew
Wish I knew
Open your eyes and discover
You’re not the only one
In disguise
Do you wonder
When the change is gonna come?
Open your eyes
You’ve got a great imagination
Open your eyes
Show it
Show it
Wish we knew
I believe it…
It’s time to face reality
I’ve received it…
Things aren’t what they used to be
I believe it…
What I see in you, you see in me
Wish I knew
Wish I knew
Wish I knew
Wish I knew
Open your eyes and discover
You’re not the only one
In disguise
Do you wonder
When the change is gonna come?
Change is gonna come
Change is gonna come
Change is gonna come
You’ve got a great imagination
Change is gonna come
Change is gonna come
Change is gonna come
You’ve got a sweet imagination
Change is gonna come
Open your eyes
Change is gonna come
Open your eyes
Change is gonna come
You’ve got a deep imagination coming
Show it
Show it
Show it
Show it
Show it
Show it


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Alan White/Steve Howe/Billy Sherwood


UNIVERSAL GARDEN

Looking up into the endless sky
Staring into the maze of time
Our existance caught in the blink of an eye
Imagining other words we try
Realizing somehow we’re all part of this
Wondrous cosmical tapestry
Beyond the sun
Beyond the sky
Are where the real questions lie
Wanting to know where it begins
The puzzle piece we are missing
Starlight
Flowering
Endlessly through the universal garden
Garden above
Looking up into the endless sky
Through space and time
Staring into the maze of time
We’ll fly
Our existence caught in the blink of an eye
Retracing years
Imagining other worlds we try
No fears
Realizing somehow we’re all part of this
Blazing a new trail
Wondrous cosmical tapestry
Beyond the sun
Beyond the sky
Are where the real questions lie
Wanting to know where it begins
The puzzle piece we are missing
Starlight
Flowering
Endlessly through the universal garden
Garden above
Investigate the science of illusion
We benefit without knowing
Our time is man-made
Our fear is man-made
Delusion man-made
Religion man-made
Love is forever
Flowering
Endlessly through the universal garden
Garden above
Beyond the sun
Beyond the sky
Are where the real questions lie
Wanting to know where it begins
The puzzle piece we are missing
Beyond the sun
Beyond the sky
Are where the real questions lie
Universal garden


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Alan White/Steve Howe/Billy Sherwood


HOMEWORLD (THE LADDER)

Nothing can take us far enough
Emotion… far enough together
As the light shines so bright
Bright enough to let us in
Nothing can bridge our souls’
Devotion… fast enough together
As the power proves you right
Right enough to let you begin
So many displaced among the future dreamers
Realised their doubles
Took a new step
A question of origin
Only in the recent past
Seeking for to realise
Skyward shone
Like beacons
A question of origin
Ten thousand millions free
To the westward light
The dreamers represent
This arc of peace
As the poets entranced
The anchor redeemed
Secrets of science
The history of the future
Was surely made
Just what keeps us so alive
Just what makes us realise
Our home
Is our world, our life
Home is our world
Nothing can take us far enough
Emotion… far enough together
As the light shines so bright
Bright enough to let us in
Nothing can bridge our souls
Devotion… fast enough together
As the power proves you right
Right enough to let you begin
Speak so fast to the prophets
Of the living
Looking for the signs
Spanning out the centuries
Search for truth
Ancient ones… they watch
And listen
Carry our wishes
Took upon themselves to guide us
Through the endless skies
Just what keeps us so alive
Just what makes us realise
Our home
Is our world, our life
Our hope is our world, our life
I have seen the passion
That’s in the hope that everyone
Will find their way into
The secret of
The home of your heart
Living within the vision
Within the power, beyond belief
We see that hate destroys the soul
Of anyone who tries to teach it
I have seen the dream
That’s in your heart
That’s in your eyes
To bring you closer to the one
It’s what keeps us so alive
It’s what makes us realise
Our home is our world, our life
Just what keeps us so alive
Just what makes us realise
Our home
Is our world, our life
Home is our world, our life
Send, ascending to the secrets
All is pure and clear to resolve
Nothing can change us now
Send, ascending to the future
Nothing can ever change us now
We follow the sun
We follow the sun
We follow the sun
Truth is a simple place
Here for us all to see
Reach as it comes to you
As it comes to me
As I will always need you inside my heart
Peace is a word we teach
A place for us all to reach
Sing as it sings to you
As it sings to me
As I will always need you inside my heart


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Alan White/Steve Howe/Billy Sherwood/Igor Khoroshev


THE MESSENGER

Judging by the voice
He was free to himself so real
We slaved ourselves to sacrifice
More than that we do not know
Then you hear him on the radio
He would play the sacred themes
That my children sang to me
Amazing as it seems
It was the answer to my dream
His heart that touches me
More than that I do not not know
Then I hear him on the radio
Remembering his every word
That my children sing to me
We have seen the world, this ecstasy
Now my children sing to me
This loving place, beyond belief
You got to stand stand to to together
Keep the message alive
You got to stand stand to to together
To keep the message alive
Spirit up moving, spirit up
Rhythm of sunfire
You got to stand stand to to together
Keep the message alive
Listening for his words
He would speak in ancient verse
So we mesmerize a way to go
Reaching out the universe
Reaching out the universal
Not afraid to learn new words
That our children sing to us
We have seen the world, this ecstasy
So his children bring to us
This inner peace, beyond belief
You got to stand stand to to together
Keep the message alive
You got to stand stand to to together
To keep the message alive
Spirit up moving, spirit up
Rhythm of sunfire
You got to stand stand to to together
Keep the message alive
One voice
One world
One touch
One life… truly, truly say it
One world… one voice
One touch… truly, truly say it
Some people realise
Some people see it
From the beginning
One world… one touch
One voice… one life
One touch… one voice… one world… one life


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Alan White/Steve Howe/Billy Sherwood/Igor Khoroshev


LAST TRAIN

Last train coming home
Last train coming home
All board the train
All board the train
Last train coming home
Last train coming home


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Steve Howe/Alan White


PERFORMED BY

Jon Anderson – lead vocals
Chris Squire – bass guitar, vocals
Trevor Rabin – guitar, vocals
Tony Kaye – keyboards, vocals
Alan White – drums, vocals
Bill Bruford – drums
Rick Wakeman – keyboards
Steve Howe – guitar, vocals


ADDITIONAL MUSICIANS

Jonathan Elias – synthesizer, keyboards, vocals
Tony Levin – bass guitar
Jimmy Haun – guitar
Billy Sherwood – bass, guitars, keyboards, vocals
Allan Schwartzberg – percussion
Gary Barlough – synthesizer
Jerry Bennett – synthesizer, percussion
Jim Crichton – synthesizer, keyboards
Gary Falcone – vocals
Deborah Anderson – vocals Jon’s daughter
Ian Lloyd – vocals
Tommy Funderburk – vocals
Sherman Foote – synthesizer
Brian Foraker – synthesizer
Chris Fosdick – synthesizer
Rory Kaplan – synthesizer
Alex Lasarenko – synthesizer, keyboards
Steve Porcaro – synthesizer
Michael Sherwood – vocals Billy’s brother
Danny Vaughn – vocals

IN THE PRESENCE OF

Deeper than every ocean
Deeper than every river
That’s what your presence brings to me
Revealing the words I listen
Seeing you in my silence
Learning I’m with you constantly
As I was before
If we were flowers
We would worship the sun
So why not now?
This high is shining brightly
Brighter than before
As the door was open wide
There inside was a diamond chair
Where I sat when I was young
I wrote down the words
Only when the young at heart
Can enter the real world
This chance I’ve waited for
For you to see
If I had chances I would spend them with you
To hold you close and let your love surround me
Deeper than before
(Deeper than every ocean)
And I know this love is real
(Deeper than every river)
Realize this is meant to be
That’s what your eyes they say to me
You are listening to how I feel
So expectedly
(Brighter than every morning)
From the ocean to the sky
(Beautiful as the sunset)
Every river to the sea
Nature surrounds me constantly
We can hear love constantly
This is for you and me
Turn around and come deeper now
So what happens when I touch you there
You feel the words roll over you
Thinking of the better scenes
The memories
As everybody else just
Hasn’t got the time
To help you anymore
‘Cause if the reason for
The things that pleasure us
To please ourselves
Not pressure us
To give our ego
Some pleasure time
Can you imagine
Any reason
To know you’re only fooling yourself
And then you’ll understand why
You’ll understand why
So if we choose to realize
All existence is a dream
This perfect resume to you
From me
Just had a tough time with magic
The death of ego
The moon
It was just coming through
Send me such a good time
In a letter form, tell me
The pleasure, no pressure
Pure imagination in a metaphoric dream
I get amazed like a true beginner
I get amazed like a true believer
I get amazed when I see you there
And I come alive
I believe I’m a true beginner
I believe I’m a true beginner
In your arms I can see it all
I can see it all
If we were flowers
We would worship the sun
So why not now?
This light is burning brightly
This light is burning brightly
Brighter than before
Brighter than before
Brighter than before
Brighter than before
Turn around and remember that
When it gets so low
As you finally hit the ground
Turn around and remember that
Now I’m standing tall
Standing on my sacred ground
Turn around and remember that
When it gets so low
As you finally hit the ground
Turn around and remember that
Now you’re standing tall
Standing on sacred ground
Standing on sacred ground
Standing on sacred ground


WRITTEN BY

Jon Anderson/Chris Squire/Steve Howe/Alan White



ADDITIONAL MUSICIANS

Jonathan Elias – synthesizer, keyboards, vocals
Tony Levin – bass guitar
Jimmy Haun – guitar
Billy Sherwood – bass, guitars, keyboards, vocals
Allan Schwartzberg – percussion
Gary Barlough – synthesizer
Jerry Bennett – synthesizer, percussion
Jim Crichton – synthesizer, keyboards
Gary Falcone – vocals
Deborah Anderson – vocals Jon’s daughter
Ian Lloyd – vocals
Tommy Funderburk – vocals
Sherman Foote – synthesizer
Brian Foraker – synthesizer
Chris Fosdick – synthesizer
Rory Kaplan – synthesizer
Alex Lasarenko – synthesizer, keyboards
Steve Porcaro – synthesizer
Michael Sherwood – vocals Billy’s brother
Danny Vaughn – vocals




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